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Hamstring exercises should be a staple in every person's training program. They are a crucial muscle group that is imperative for daily function. The play an important role on a wide spectrum from simple activity to more powerful exercises! To warm up your hamstrings, a healthy dose of dynamic mobility, muscle setting and strengthening, as well as nervous system priming is what creates an excellent warm up routine. Not to worry, you don't have to feel limited to the traditional and boring standing hamstrings stretch and leg curls. In this article, you will learn how to warm up your hamstrings with a variety of excellent exercises targeting mobility, nervous system activation, and muscle activation!

Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics when performing a squat? Did you know there are different ways to squat by using a knee strategy versus a hip strategy? A knee strategy has been shown to increase the risk of tibiofemoral joint injuries, patellofemoral joint pain, patella tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome. Utilizing a hip strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a knee vs. a hip strategy, and how to fix knee pain with squatting!

Step up and step down exercise variations are amazingly simple, yet truly effective in lower extremity rehab. Step-ups will always be a staple drill in rehabilitation and strength and conditioning programs. Considering the unilateral, weight-bearing nature of the step-up, it effectively challenges recruitment patterns analogous to those encountered during routine activities of daily living and sport. Adding variability to the classic step ups and downs is key to movement proficiency and developing a well-rounded athlete. In addition, the step down is a great way to promote eccentric strength in our lower body, as well as joint stability and control with movements that translate to our activities of daily living as well. In this article, we are going to show you how to master step up and step down variations!

Banded side stepsโ€ฆ.ooooh so fancy and sexy! But really, there is an over-obsession with the banded side step exercise in the fitness community, yet most don't really need to do this exercise if they are already healthy and strong as the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for the gluteus medius in the exercise is not even at an adequate level for true strength gains (<40% MVIC). However, in the rehab setting, the banded side step and all of its variations (e.g. monster walks) are great for re-training proper movement patterns and neuromuscular control. Furthermore, bands are a great way to increase the MVIC in the exercise and challenge the patient even further. But all of this is only true if you perform this exercise correctly! In this article, you will learn our fool-proof method to perform the banded side step exercise correctly!

This article will feature 5 different phases of a dynamic basketball prehab warm up. The dynamic warm up will be broken up into dynamic mobility, glute activation, core activation, agility activation, and plyometric activation. Each of these 5 phases plays an important role in improving basketball performance.

If you have played in various sports such as ice hockey or soccer before, you are probably familiar with tweaking your groin muscle (adductor). A groin strain is an injury to the muscle-tendon unit of the adductor tendon or its insertion into the pubic bone. The reason groin strains are so common during hockey and soccer is that it requires such a strong eccentric contraction (muscle lengthening against gravity) of the adductor musculature. Other sports that require twisting, turning, kicking, and sprinting, such as tennis, rugby, football (American), basketball, and running have also been associated with groin strains. Moreover, adductor strains may happen with other activities involving general exercise if our body is not adequately prepared for various movements. Although common, there are plenty of ways to prehab your groin in an effort to prevent adductor injuries! This article will give you actionable exercises on how to prehab your groin strain!

The bridge is a versatile exercise that can be used for developing great gluteal muscle function. Individuals with back and hip pathologies are often taught to perform bridges in the hook-lying position, elevating the pelvis off the floor. This exercise is particularly useful for facilitating pelvic motions and strengthening the low back and hip extensors. In addition, O'Sullivan et al. have demonstrated the bridges ability to enhance motor control of the lumbo-pelvic region. This article will help you improve the bridge exercise!

Hamstring injuries are among the most common non-contact injuries in sports. It is important to train hamstring muscles optimally in order to prevent these injuries from occurring. In this article, we're going to show you how to strengthen your hamstrings, by covering our favorite hamstring exercises including nordic hamstring curl variations as well as swiss ball hamstring variations to prehab against hamstring strains!

The stork exercise (also referred to as the captain morgan exercise), is one of our all-time favorites for gluteus medius activation and neural priming prior to exercise. Not only is it already in a functional weight-bearing position, but you can ramp up as much activation as you want by pushing harder and harder into the wall. Follow along in this article as we show you stork exercise variations for gluteus medius activation, as well as other wall-supported hip exercises!

Did you know there are 27 muscles that cross the ball and socket hip joint?! Some muscles act as primary movers while others act as dynamic stabilizers for the hip. When the hip capsule is hypomobile (or tight), your body is likely to compensate either up or down the kinetic chain to still achieve movement. This can lead to various pathologies in the lumbar spine as well as the lower extremity (1-5). The good news is there are many ways that someone can improve their hip mobility. In this article, you will learn why hip mobility is important for overall movement capacity and longevity, and we will show you 4 exercises to improve your hip mobility!