Do you have pain that is on the outside of one of your hips? Does it bother you when you are laying on your side or trying to sleep at night? If you have answered yes to one of these questions, you may be dealing with either hip bursitis or a gluteal tendinopathy. Both of these conditions can be difficult to differentiate in regards to their symptoms and clinical presentation; however, it is important to understand the differences between them both. In this article, we will help you understand why you may be having lateral hip pain, and what you can do to help manage your symptoms.

What do offensive lineman, relief pitchers, stay at home defensemen, long snappers, caddies, and the groin muscles all have in common? They are all under-appreciated but play a crucial role in their respective systems! The groin is one of the most commonly injured muscle groups in athletes, especially in rotational athletes. In this article, you will learn the importance of completing advanced groin training at the end stages of a groin strain and with specific prehab interventions in order to prevent a groin injury in the first place!

The gluteus medius or glute med for short is a muscle on the lateral portion of the hip that is crucial for a variety of activities of daily living. When we try to perform higher-level activities like weight lifting and sports activities, this muscle becomes even more important! Why? The glute med is so important because it is vital to our ability to stabilize ourselves during single leg balance. While we might not realize it, we live on 1 leg a lot. Walking, for instance, is the act of repeatedly balancing on a single leg over and over again. Strengthening the glute med can also help to resolve hip pain, low back pain, and even pain at your knee or foot! This article will take a closer look at what the glute med does as well as some of the best exercises for training this muscle.

Have you been dealing with a nagging pain in your buttock that just doesn't want to go away? You've tried everything. Ice, heat, massaging the area, but nothing is working! This annoyance of pain around the backside of your hip may be due to a condition known as 'piriformis syndrome', which is somewhat of a conundrum in the healthcare field. This condition can be a real pain in the butt, (pun intended). In this article, we will discuss piriformis syndrome, and what you can do to help relieve your pain that could be stemming from this 'condition'.

Lunges are one of the most commonly performed exercises in rehab and general fitness alike - and for good reason. You are able to target different muscle groups or movement patterns just simply by changing up lunge directions from forward, to backward, to sideways, or even into a curtsey squat. Furthermore, the use of certain equipment such as sliders or steps can add a new twist to a traditional lunge to hit your therapeutic goals.  In this article, we're going to dissect one of the easiest ways to spice up your lunges by simply changing directions.

Trendelenburg gait, otherwise referred to as a hip drop or trunk lean with walking are all compensatory movement patterns that may lead to back pain, hip pain, knee pain, or SI joint pain over time. There are many reasons this may occur, some of which include pain secondary to a recent injury or surgery, poor hip strength, limited mobility, inhibited hip musculature, developed movement compensations, and much more. It is important to be aware of this movement impairment, as this can lead to problems up and down the kinetic chain. This article will demonstrate excellent exercises to fix your Trendelenburg gait starting with activation, followed by strengthening, and finally movement re-training!

Are you a runner trying to stay healthy so that you don't have to stop running? If you're looking for exercise solutions for a running injury and want to learn running injury prevention knowledge, you've come to the right place. We have simplified the literature investigating common running injuries to bring you not only our favorite but the most effective runner's prehab exercises. In this article, you will learn runner's prehab exercises that you should be doing as well as the knowledge that will protect you against common running injuries!

Stretching after a workout is very common in recovery programs. 'Tight' muscles that are not properly managed could lead to potential muscle imbalances, abnormal movement patterns and compensatory strategies, and even muscle spasms. The hamstrings are responsible for specific muscle actions in different body regions and contribute to many movements that we perform daily! They too can become 'tight' and as a result, can contribute to some of the issues we mentioned earlier. The positive is that there are many different ways to stretch your hamstrings, with individualized variations! However, as with any movement, there are many ways to do it! And some are much more advantageous than others! For starters, proper hamstring stretching does not mean that you should only be feeling a stretch in your foot! And if you are going to stretch your hamstrings, you must know why you are doing so! In this article, we will show you proper hamstring stretching, and how you can implement various techniques as part of your daily routine to keep you moving often and moving well!

Bone Stress Injuries (BSI) are not uncommon in avid runners, track and field athletes, and endurance athletes. As common as they may be, they are still very difficult to deal, hard to identify for the average person, and unfortunately can turn into full-blown bone stress fractures before being correctly identified and treated. In this article, we will discuss exactly what bone stress injuries and bone stress fractures are, what the risk factors are, and prehab strategies to get back to running after a bone stress fracture.

‘Dead Butt Syndrome’ - SAY WHAT?! There are more and more articles coming out, especially in recent months in light of our global pandemic, about a supposed ‘dead butt syndrome’, or ‘gluteal amnesia’. This condition is thought to be characterized by a person’s body ‘forgetting’ how to ‘turn on’ or ‘fire’ a gluteal contraction due to extended periods of time in a seated position. But can this actually happen? If it does happen, how does this actually happen anatomically? Can our glute muscles actually ‘forget’ how to activate properly? Do long periods of sitting actually have an effect on our muscle mass, appearance, and strength? In this article, we explore the validity of this topic about how to turn on your glutes as well as provide you with exercises that will actually target your glutes!