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Remember being a kid in elementary school and having to perform various tests of fitness? Usually these tests involved running a pre-determined distance, sit ups, push ups, maybe some baseline flexibility testingโ€ฆ.and, of course, THE PULL UP! If you are anything like me, this was the most dreaded portion of the test. I couldnโ€™t do a pull up if my life depended on it! In fact, I couldnโ€™t perform a single strict pull up until I was 30 years old. Ready to achieve your first one? Follow along for the best strengthening exercises for pull ups!

Whether you are looking to add variability in your overhead pressing routine, achieving your first handstand push-up, or a CrossFit Athlete needing to return to and build capacity in this skill; we will guide you! This is a challenging movement requiring commitment to achieve but as we know the greater the challenge the greater the reward!ย Follow along to learn how to work your way from the beginning all the way to mastering handstand push ups!

In the musculoskeletal rehabilitative field, we often label different movement and postural pathologies with far-reaching garbage bag terms. Some examples include the upper or lower crossed syndromes, a "SICK" scapula, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), or the subject of this article, scapular dyskinesia. Now, garbage bag terms don't necessarily mean that these terms are inherently garbage. They often cast a wide net, capturing many musculoskeletal deficits, providing a general diagnosis for the patient and clinician to work from together. It's understandable why we use them: generally the patient appreciates having a name attached to the reason behind their pain. However, depending on the training and opinions of the clinician, these terms often receive criticism from those in the healthcare field. Are movement and postural pathologies legitimate? For example, is scapular dyskinesia a medical diagnosis or simply a descriptive term to capture aberrant scapular mechanics? More importantly, what is scapular dyskinesia and how do we define this? Is it truly possible to quantify scapular dyskinesia? And if it's truly present, does it actually contribute to shoulder pain -- and can we make a positive impact with a detailed physical therapy or rehabilitation program? If interested, read on: we're going to dive into these questions together here.

Every sport has some specific skill that makes it unique. The skill is needed to excel in the sport due to the demands of the environment or competition. One of those unique skills in the sport of CrossFit, gymnastics, and obstacle course racing is the kipping pull-up. Derived from gymnastics, the kip made its way into CrossFit, allowing increased intensity and power output while completing the same amount of work as a strict pull-up. As with any skill, if we rush the process to develop it without paying attention to our foundation injury can occur. Once that happens the question becomes, "How do I return to kipping pull-ups?"

The biceps is a very important muscle in our upper arm that plays an integral role in our function. The muscle runs from the front of the shoulder to the elbow. It has two proximal tendon attachments to the shoulder and one insertion point at the elbow. The function of the biceps is to flex the elbow and to supinate, or rotate, the forearm into a palm up position. It also assists in shoulder flexion, helping to raise the arm forward. One of these two tendons rarely suffers from injury while the other tendon is particularly susceptible to pain, injury and associated shoulder dysfunction! In this article you'll learn why that is, as well as the risk factors, treatment, and prevention strategies to take care of that pesky biceps pain. Follow along in this article as we demonstrate some awesome biceps tendon pain exercises!

The shoulder is a complicated body part. It is an extremely mobile joint that is able to move within many different planes of movement; however, as a result of its ability to move excessively, its stability may sometimes become compromised. In addition, there are other parts of our body that are required to move efficiently in sync with the shoulder in order for healthy shoulder mobility to occur. Because the shoulder is quite complex, proximal body parts are often overlooked when creating various shoulder exercise programs. The glenohumeral joint (shoulder ball-and-socket joint) sits on the scapula (shoulder blade), which moves in accord with the thoracic spine (Mid-Back). A shoulder exercise program is not comprehensive unless all components of the shoulder are addressed. This article will help you understand the various motions that must occur at the shoulder, the spine, and upper extremity as an entire unit, as well as show you excellent exercises that will guide you in how to bulletproof your shoulders!

Healthy shoulders are essential to participating in life, exercise, and recreational activities without pain or restrictions. However, healthy shoulders require maintenance and attention. Below you learn the ultimate shoulder warm-up before lifting, which includes some of our favorite mobility drills, stretches, and exercises that should be a part of everyone's shoulder maintenance.

The scapula is one of the least congruent joints in the body. There is no bony articulation between the scapula and the thorax. This is why the scapula can move so easily, essentially it is a free-floating bone that can move into protraction/retraction, elevation/depression, anterior tilt/posterior tilt, internal/external rotation, and upward/downward rotation. We can not change the structure of this scapulothoracic joint, ย however, we can improve scapular control! Scapula position is almost fully determined by the pulling of muscle groups that attach to the scapula. The scapula is the core of the upper body, this is where the force comes in through and gets distributed out of. This article will demonstrate exercises that you can do on your own to improve your scapula control.

Do your shoulders feel like they are loose? Has your shoulder suddenly popped out of its socket, and back into place? Have you ever been in a position where you raise your arm up and say to yourself, โ€œWow it felt like my shoulder was going to come out of place!โ€? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may have what is known as 'shoulder instability'. This happens to occur in many individuals, as the shoulder is the most mobile joint in our entire body, and as a result, its stability is often sacrificed. Sometimes, certain injuries may accompany an episode of instability that can be categorized either as a subluxation (transient slip in and out of a joint), or dislocation (a joint moves and stays out of place). How do we avoid these episodes of instability from occurring? [P]Rehab!! Follow along in this article, as we will discuss how and why shoulder instability occurs, what common signs and symptoms of shoulder instability are, and the ultimate guide of how to prevent shoulder instability!

The shoulder is a very complex joint, one of the most complex in the human body. Moreover, it is the most mobile joint, which means that as a result, it must sacrifice some of its stability. It is imperative for the musculature and soft tissue structures surrounding the shoulder to be bulletproofed with strength in order to give that stability the shoulder needs to function at its optimal capacity. In this article, we will be demonstrating and explaining our favorite evidence based shoulder exercises. Principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and electromyography will be explained as well and you'll learn how to increase targeted muscle activation, improve scapular muscle activation sequencing, and challenge shoulder stability!