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The Serratus Anterior, which is also known as the โ€œBig Swing Muscleโ€ or โ€œBoxerโ€™s muscleโ€, is an important muscle that helps optimize proper movement of our shoulders. Not only does this muscle have a cool name, but it is also needed for a plethora of arm movements; whether it be an open chain movement (punching/grabbing something out of the cabinet) or a closed chain movement (pushups, planks, downward dogs, or handstands). Moreover, the serratus anterior is probably best known for its help in preventing scapular winging, which is when our shoulder blade abnormally moves away from our thorax during arm movements. This article will demonstrate the best serratus anterior exercises to improve activation and control of this very important scapular stabilizer!

Adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, affects 2-5% of the general population and is characterized by pain and progressive loss of shoulder range of motion. Frozen shoulder onset can follow trauma to the shoulder, such as a fracture, surgery, or period of immobilization. Adhesive capsulitis can also have an insidious onset, with no prior trauma or injury to the shoulder. There are many established risk factors for the onset of insidious adhesive capsulitis. Of those, diabetics have been identified as having a significantly higher risk of development, severity, and recurrence of insidious onset adhesive capsulitis. In this article, we will help you understand what the term adhesive capsulitis is, what diabetes is, causes and risk factors for these conditions, as well as what the literature is supporting in regards to the correlation between frozen shoulder and diabetes!

Looking to improve shoulder overhead mobility but not sure where to start? Maybe you've been told by a clinician or a coach that you need to improve this specific motion, or perhaps you're looking for a guide to help someone else improve their overhead mobility! Shoulder overhead mobility requires multiple moving body parts working together in synchrony. Without adequate motion in the right places, you run the risk of exposing other body regions to excessive strain due to compensatory strategies with attempted shoulder overhead movements. With that being said, addressing limited shoulder overhead mobility requires a multi-dimensional approach. In this article, we will teach you how to assess and improve shoulder overhead mobility with our guidelines.

Are you dealing with a rotator cuff injury? If you answered yes, don't worry! Regardless of the severity of your rotator cuff injury, there is a solution out there for you. We have helped thousands of people with rotator cuff issues, it just comes down to quality education and exercises. In this article, you'll learn about rotator cuff injuries, rotator cuff tests, and exercises for rotator cuff injury!

The Turkish Get Up (TGU) is a full-body, three-dimensional exercise that is great for shoulder stability, muscle endurance, and grip strength. As we perform this unique and artistic-like movement, there are a variety of high demand positions that our body must meet with the utmost quality in order to perform it successfully and safely. This includes excellent mobility in various aspects of the body, stability,ย strength,ย coordination, and mental focus. What is important to understand is that just because the Turkish is get up is a great exercise for may different aspects of movement, that does NOT mean everyone can or should be able to do it instantaneously without specific, individualized practice! In this article, you will learn everything you need to know to not screw up the Turkish Get Up.

The barbell bench press is arguably one of the most effective movements in developing strength and power in the upper body. Itโ€™s a great way to train the primary pushers of the upper body, including the pectoralis group, the deltoids, and the triceps. Despite the bench press being such a vital movement to help with horizontal pushing, it is one of those movements that every now and then will be limited secondary to shoulder pain, frequently in the front part of the shoulder. If bench pressing creates irritation in your shoulder, the answer is not to avoid bench pressing for 6 weeks and hope that you will magically be capable of bench-pressing pain-free again. The worst thing to do is nothing, which would lead to weakness and potentially creating more of an issue. This article will take you through 3 steps to allow you to bench press without shoulder pain.

The ability to reach behind your back does not seem so important until it is taken away from you. Washing your back, grabbing your wallet, taking off your bra, putting on a belt, you name it. All of these simple activities of daily life can become quite difficult the moment you can no longer do them without an issue! However, you can get this motion back with the right exercises, discipline, and ultimately patience. In this article, you'll learn high quality strategies of how to improve reaching behind your back.

The latissimus dorsi, or the lats for short, play a huge role in shoulder function and health. Often times, these muscles become tight and stiff after injury, surgery, immobilization, a lack of stretching, or repetitive lat overuse/overdevelopment! Because they act to extend and internally rotate the shoulder as well as depress the shoulder girdle, they can severely limit your ability to achieve an optimal overhead position. This is a very important position for just about anyone who does anything with their arms overhead: weightlifters, swimmers, mechanics, athletes, gymnasts, you name it - the overhead position is important for a lot of people! Because so many individuals need full overhead mobility, stretching the lats is a part of many athlete's [P]Rehab programs. This article will show you some of the best lat stretches out there, and more importantly, how to maintain your overhead mobility after lat stretching!

This article is all about basketball shoulder instability rehab! Shoulder injuries are not uncommon in basketball. Shoulder instability can be the result of a shoulder dislocation, labrum injury, or secondary to musculoskeletal or neurological impairments. In this article, you will learn more about shoulder instability in general and how to address it with early, middle, and late rehab progressions. More importantly, you will learn how to prescribe basketball shoulder instability rehab that is specific to the basketball athlete.