Shoulder

Scapular dyskinesis (aka SICK scapula syndrome) is an alteration or deviation in the normal resting or active position of the scapula during shoulder movement. This observation of "abnormal" or "erratic" movement is often associated with pain.ย โ‰But does scapular dyskinesis actually cause a painful shoulder? Does SICK scapula equal painย โ‰

Rock climbing is a sport that has been gaining popularity over the last few years. The diverse range of movement, mobility, and strength the sport requires makes it appealing to everyone from the weekend warrior to the most serious and dedicated athlete. This fast-growing allure has helped catapult climbing into the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The three disciplines that will be included in the upcoming Olympics are sport, bouldering, and speed. Each discipline has its own unique demands varying in power, agility, strength, and endurance naturally inducing risk for both traumatic and overuse injury. In this article, I will highlight the most common injuries seen in rock climbing and demonstrate rock climbing prehab exercises based on research and biomechanics to prevent these injuries.

This isn't your average rotator cuff and scapula article. We will be demonstrating and explaining seven evidence based shoulder exercises. Principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and electromyography will be explained and you'll learn how to increase targeted muscle activation, improve scapular muscle activation sequencing, and challenge shoulder stability. We are taking broscience to the next level, providing research and evidence based shoulder exercises to prehab the shoulders for longevity.

Functional Range Conditioning (FRC), created by @drandreospina, is essential to incorporate into your practice. FRC focuses on improving mobility. Mobility, in an FRC sense, is defined as STRENGTH + CONTROL in order to expand upon usable ranges of motion, articular resilience (i.e. load bearing capacity), and overall joint health. Prioritizing FRC principles in your training and [P]Rehab program can be a huge game changer! This article will provide you an intro to FRC principles provided with exercise examples.

This article will use a global approach, via Developmental Kinesiology, to train muscles through purposeful movements. Some of you may know this as โ€œDynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization,โ€ (DNS). DNS is originated by Pavel Kolar, who was known as one of the best student of the legend Vlademir Janda. The basis of DNS is on developmental kinesiology; that in early childhood your movement pattern is automatic, predictable, and genetically formed as the nervous system matures.

The bench press is perhaps the most recognized and famous upper body exercise. It has been suggested the bench press has its roots dating back to ancient greek times. For over hundreds of years there have been countless discussion inside and out of gyms regarding training tips, myths, and actual scientific facts. With so much information coming in and out of the gym from โ€œexpertsโ€, its hard to filter out the good versus the bad. In this article, weโ€™ll break down scientifically proven ways to maximize your bench press gains, break PRs, andย how to break through that bench press plateau.

The team at Accelerate Sports Performance and Training Slate will be discussing the importance of specific muscle activation prior to strength training. More activation = better recruitment = GAINS.ย Activation techniques can be used in combination with strength exercises in a unilateral or bilateral fashion. In the following posts, they hope to spark some mental juices on how to approach activation exercises for your various lifts, while taking into account some very commonly seen issues in strength training as it relates to arthrokinematic and osteokinematic movement, or natural movement in general.

The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles and their associated tendons that span the shoulder joint, or more anatomically speaking, the glenohumeral joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff is extremely vital to dynamic shoulder joint stability, as they are the only muscles that directly span the glenohumeral joint. While our bigger muscles, like our deltoids, lats, and pectorals control gross movements around the shoulder, the RC acts to stabilize the glenohumeral joint during these movements.