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Sitting for too long has been shown to have a negative impact on your body. With sedentary behavior, changes are seen in insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular and metabolic function, along with increased risk of mortality. This includes high blood sugar, elevated blood pressure, and increased body fat and cholesterol levels. Research suggests that on average, adults sit for approximately 60% of their waking day, which is more than 7 hours!It is our job to help you take ownership of your body, and not allow environmental factors to dictate your movement capacity. Follow along in this article to learn some awesome desk job exercises you can easily replicate with just yourself and about 3-5 feet of space.

“We knew we could run in the mud because of our strength training,” reported by Coach Keith Andrew who led his high school boys cross country team to a 2006 Nike Team Nationals on a very waterlogged Portland course. (4) Often times, strength training is feared in the world of distance running. Well, I'm here today to bust that myth! Let's dive into the importance of resistance training, specifically using plyometrics as a way to further develop as a runner. Keep reading to find the plyometric exercises for distance runners you didn't even know you needed.

Summertime is here and you want the hard work you've been putting in the gym to be recognized when you are outside enjoying the sunshine with your friends. You've been doing the same training routine since high school and feel like you have hit a plateau for gaining muscle. While you want to change things up, you are worried you may get hurt while trying to gain muscle. "Ain't nobody got time for that!" In this article, we will help you understand  strategies to gain muscle without injury!

There are many cultural themes that carry between different sports physical therapy settings, especially at the higher levels of competition, but one that has always stuck out to me is the concept of massage. It doesn't matter if you're an elite athlete, a weekend warrior, a high school track runner, an elderly fall risk patient or you've been referred to me for a one time visit from your orthopedist -- the question is painfully frequent regardless of patient demographics: "can I get a massage?" Selfishly, I'm excited to write this article to have on hand as an educational piece for many of my athletes -- rather than explain my thought process verbally time and time again. If you are one of my athletes, please know you've been sent to this article in an effort to further polish up your already deep knowledge of how to better take care of your body. But more likely than not, you aren't an athlete under my care -- and in that case, I hope to temper your expectations and beliefs behind this passive intervention. Read on to learn more about massage and recovery.

Every sport has some specific skill that makes it unique. The skill is needed to excel in the sport due to the demands of the environment or competition. One of those unique skills in the sport of CrossFit, gymnastics, and obstacle course racing is the kipping pull-up. Derived from gymnastics, the kip made its way into CrossFit, allowing increased intensity and power output while completing the same amount of work as a strict pull-up. As with any skill, if we rush the process to develop it without paying attention to our foundation injury can occur. Once that happens the question becomes, "How do I return to kipping pull-ups?"

Are you considering more medicine ball exercises, AKA med ball exercises, in your routine but aren't sure what to do or how to proceed? Perhaps you've seen some cool medicine ball exercises going down in your gym and on social media. Maybe you've come across some great deals online for med balls, which might be a nice addition to your home gym but you want to make sure you know how to use them! With that being said, understanding the purpose behind the different applications of medicine ball exercises will help you decide exactly how to begin when you pick up that med ball! Continue reading to learn how to determine the best medicine ball exercises for you!

Got a pain in the front of your shins that just does not want to go away? Have you been running a lot or playing a lot of sports that involve jumping activity? If so, you may be dealing with what is known as 'shin splints'. This lower leg injury often due to overuse is a difficult one to rehabilitate for many reasons, one of which being its obscurity. Shin splints, which is better known as 'medial tibial stress syndrome', is an injury more common in endurance athletes such as runners, as well as athletes involved in jumping sports such as basketball or volleyball, who are placing large amounts of stress with high volume through their lower extremities. In this article, we are going to show you the best shin splints exercises that will get you out of pain and back to your activities!

Think about that last ankle sprain or wrist sprain you suffered, what did you do  immediately following the injury? Probably ice, add a little compression, and elevate that body part. Great idea, you did the right thing, but it’s time for the therapy world to shift away from the acronym RICE and shift towards the POLICE Principle for injury recovery and tissue healing. Haven’t heard this acronym yet? Want to learn how to speed up the recovery process? Want to learn why rice/rest doesn't work for injuries? Well, you’ve come to the right place.