Have you ever experienced pain at a joint and/or muscle? Well, you are not alone. It is pretty safe to say that everyone at some point in their life will experience some sort of musculoskeletal pain. Traditionally, we are quick to blame the affected body part and address it in a localized fashion. What if I told you that your bad knees, shoulder, low back, etc. are only the victims of a dysfunction elsewhere in your body? Treating the ‘painful’ body part can potentially improve your symptoms, but ultimately this remedy is destined to only be temporary, as the dysfunction elsewhere in the body is left untreated. Think of it as having a flat tire in your car and trying to fix the steering wheel for not working properly. Learn how to independently understand, identify problems, and improve your body's mobility. Consequently, learn how to address pain anywhere in your body with a more promising and lasting approach! In this article, we are going to show you the joint-by-joint approach for mobility to enhance your movement patterns!

Do you have pain that is on the outside of one of your hips? Does it bother you when you are laying on your side or trying to sleep at night? If you have answered yes to one of these questions, you may be dealing with either hip bursitis or a gluteal tendinopathy. Both of these conditions can be difficult to differentiate in regards to their symptoms and clinical presentation; however, it is important to understand the differences between them both. In this article, we will help you understand why you may be having lateral hip pain, and what you can do to help manage your symptoms.

Sure, Osgood-Schlatter disease is a hard name to say, but sometimes it’s an even harder condition to know how to manage and treat effectively. Great news is, this condition is very treatable with physical therapy and many young athletes come back stronger and healthier following rehab for Osgood-Schlatter disease as a result. What's not to love about that! Let’s dive into what exactly this diagnosis means, who it affects and why, and the best exercises for Osgood-Schlatter disease to keep you active and doing what you love!

What do offensive lineman, relief pitchers, stay at home defensemen, long snappers, caddies, and the groin muscles all have in common? They are all under-appreciated but play a crucial role in their respective systems! The groin is one of the most commonly injured muscle groups in athletes, especially in rotational athletes. In this article, you will learn the importance of completing advanced groin training at the end stages of a groin strain and with specific prehab interventions in order to prevent a groin injury in the first place!

Have you been dealing with a nagging pain in your buttock that just doesn't want to go away? You've tried everything. Ice, heat, massaging the area, but nothing is working! This annoyance of pain around the backside of your hip may be due to a condition known as 'piriformis syndrome', which is somewhat of a conundrum in the healthcare field. This condition can be a real pain in the butt, (pun intended). In this article, we will discuss piriformis syndrome, and what you can do to help relieve your pain that could be stemming from this 'condition'.

OUCH! Pain in the ball of your foot when you step down, walk, or run? Feel like there is a large pebble or rock in your shoe? Have stubborn pain on the bottom of the foot that just won’t go away? You may be experiencing a common, yet often undiagnosed condition called Morton’s neuroma. Morton’s neuroma is a benign, yet very painful condition that occurs when a nerve running in between your toes gets irritated or compressed and starts to cause discomfort. In this article, we will discuss causes and treatments for this condition, as well as give you some exercise and stretching tools to combat your pain!

Americans consume a large majority of the world’s opioids. Approximately 80% of the global opioid supply is consumed in the United States, a country that represents a mere 5% of the global population. There were approximately 300 million pain prescriptions written in the US in 2015 equating to a $24 billion market. While we seem to know a fair amount about pain from the financial side, the actual science behind pain is still somewhat of an enigma. Let's take a closer look at pain science.

This article is going to be a little different than our usual format. Rather than highlighting an exercise, answering a rehab question, or breaking down complex pathology, this article is going to focus on how to build and maintain good habits. Our goal as physical therapists is almost always to change a patient's habits in some way. Regardless of what has led a patient into physical therapy or to starting a [P]Rehab program, their goal is often to decrease pain, increase function, and reach their body's full potential, which typically happens by a change in habits! As the new year approaches and many people consider their New Year's Resolutions, I thought this guidance would be particularly timely.  Atomic Habits by James Clear is a New York Times bestseller that highlights some simple strategies to build and maintain good habits while eliminating bad ones. This article will highlight some of these strategies along with their application to fitness and rehab. We are here to discuss everything related to atomic exercise habits!

What is pain and where does it come from? Pain is an output from the brain, it is a real experience that is always unique to that individual, and is dependent on meaning, which is always context-dependent. It relies on biology, ecology, psychology, and sociology! Furthermore, the output of pain depends on past experiences, perspectives, the internal and external environment, emotions, and predictions. Even though it is an output from the brain, pain can be experienced anywhere in the body regardless of the presence or absence of tissue or structural damage. But is pain really all your head then? In this article, we will break down this simple yet complex question to help you better understand where pain comes from as well as pain science!

If you’ve ever been to a gym where people are lifting weights, you’ve likely seen people wearing weightlifting belts. This begs the question - why are weightlifting belts and exercises paired together? Why do some people only use weightlifting belts with certain exercises versus some people wear weightlifting belts with every exercise? The biggest questions - how do they work, do they actually help you lift more weight, and do they make you “safer” or prevent injury?  In this article, we will explore some of these questions, share our opinions, and let you decide whether a weightlifting belt would be beneficial to your training or not!