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Think about that last ankle sprain or wrist sprain you suffered, what did you do  immediately following the injury? Probably ice, add a little compression, and elevate that body part. Great idea, you did the right thing, but it’s time for the therapy world to shift away from the acronym RICE and shift towards the POLICE Principle for injury recovery and tissue healing. Haven’t heard this acronym yet? Want to learn how to speed up the recovery process? Want to learn why ice and rest doesn't work for injuries? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

If you’re a runner, you understand the importance of lacing up the shoes, putting in the miles, building up that base, and getting in a few days at the gym. While this is certainly a recipe for success, it’s not always the best recipe for success. Why? What’s the magic ingredient we are missing? Well let me ask you, when is the last time you hit the weight room and more importantly, when is the last time you lifted with an emphasis on power training to improve your speed? I stumped you, huh? Power is often that missing ingredient from a runner’s perfect training plan to improve speed and get you to the finish line quicker. Check out this blog for the best power exercises for runners to develop speed. And from this point on it's speedy miles and podium finishes!

It's a pretty common story we hear in physical therapy practice on a weekly (maybe daily) basis: "I've been told by my (insert healthcare provider here) that my hip alignment is off and my hips are out of place. Can you put them back quick before we start our session today?", "I don't think my pelvis is aligned right, my one leg feels longer than the other. Can you take a look?", or "Can you do a quick check for me? My alignment is off." I doubt it. But we should probably dive a little bit deeper than that shouldn't we? There is a ton to unpack here. To be honest, it's probably one of the most emotionally charged topics within this field. That being said, I hope I can bring some good discussion to the table today, and help provide some reassurance for you. I'll say it again, and trust I do so with a positive and optimistic demeanor (not a dismissive one): I doubt the notion that your hips really are out of alignment, and for good reason in your favor! Let's try and break this down mechanically, culturally, psychosocially and take a look from an evidence-based perspective -- visiting some pertinent literature along the way. Read on if I've caught your attention!

"Stop cracking your knuckles or you'll ruin your joints, Your joint is out and we will pop it back in." These statements or narratives seem to surround the snap, crackle, and pop of our cracking joints. History and research show us the first statement is not true and this was likely a parenting strategy to get kids to stop cracking their knuckles because parents were getting annoyed with the noise! However, the other questions remain and in this article, we will answer them along with giving the scientific rationale of what the popping sound truly is!

Have you ever had tingling in your hands or feet, or a burning, shooting sensation down your arm? If so, you may be dealing with nerve related pain, which can be quite discomforting. When we think of enhancing our mobility, we often think of "tight muscles" or "stiff joints", right? Ah, I gotta loosen up my low back, or I need to release my hip flexors. Yes these are all great examples of how we attack mobility deficits; however, we need to ensure that with any mobility program we do not miss an often forgotten integral piece: The Nervous System! Both our central nervous system (CNS), which consists of our brain and spinal cord, as well as our peripheral nervous system (PNS), the nerves that lie outside the CNS, each are intimately associated with our body movements and function. In this article, we are going to explain the basics behind nerve pain, and how to relieve it with neurodynamics!

Got a nagging pain on the outside of your foot or pinky toe that just won’t go away? Are you an athlete that does repetitive jumping or running activities? You may have a Jones fracture! A Jones fracture is a break in the shaft of the bone of the 5th metatarsal (pinky toe) and most often results from repetitive strain. It can also be caused by acute trauma, such as dropping an object on your foot. Either way, it is treatable and does not have to interfere with the things you love to do every day! In this article, we will discuss the Jones fracture, its causes and symptoms, treatment and management, and some rehabilitative jones fracture exercises to get you back on your feet stronger than ever!

Have you ever experienced pain at a joint and/or muscle? Well, you are not alone. It is pretty safe to say that everyone at some point in their life will experience some sort of musculoskeletal pain. Traditionally, we are quick to blame the affected body part and address it in a localized fashion. What if I told you that your bad knees, shoulder, low back, etc. are only the victims of a dysfunction elsewhere in your body? Treating the ‘painful’ body part can potentially improve your symptoms, but ultimately this remedy is destined to only be temporary, as the dysfunction elsewhere in the body is left untreated. Think of it as having a flat tire in your car and trying to fix the steering wheel for not working properly. Learn how to independently understand, identify problems, and improve your body's mobility. Consequently, learn how to address pain anywhere in your body with a more promising and lasting approach! In this article, we are going to show you the joint-by-joint approach for mobility to enhance your movement patterns!

Do you have pain that is on the outside of one of your hips? Does it bother you when you are laying on your side or trying to sleep at night? If you have answered yes to one of these questions, you may be dealing with either hip bursitis or a gluteal tendinopathy. Both of these conditions can be difficult to differentiate in regards to their symptoms and clinical presentation; however, it is important to understand the differences between them both. In this article, we will help you understand why you may be having lateral hip pain, and what you can do to help manage your symptoms.