Knee

Landing mechanics has always been a hot topic in sports medicine. Letโ€™s be honest, watching elite athletes perform at a high level and analyzing their movement is sexier than most low-level rehab exercises for movement enthusiasts. So itโ€™s natural for clinicians and trainers to get excited when teaching someone landing mechanics. In this article, youโ€™ll learn the basics of what to focus on with teaching landing mechanics.

Jumper's knee is when there is irritation of the patella tendon, the tendon just beneath your knee cap. Patella tendon pain is a common source of anterior (front) knee pain often occurring from repetitive or excessive overload onto the patellar tendon. This is often a condition of younger athletes, especially men, who participate in jumping sports such as volleyball, tennis, football, and basketball. Patella Tendinopathy is debilitating and can result in the prolonged absence and potential retirement from sports. Loading the tendon is the primary stimulus which helps with tendon health! This article will take you through a few common jumper's knee exercises!

โ€œWhen will I be fully recovered?" This is honestly one of the most common questions we receive in the clinic working with patients, answering messages on social media, and responding to comments and emails. Understanding recovery from an injury has to begin with understanding what full recovery means to someone. Recovery is also a popular word now within the fitness and sports medicine world in reference to the body's physical readiness. From recreational weightlifters to pro athletes - everyone is eager to learn how to recover faster and push the boundaries of human performance. In this article, we will dive deep into understanding recovery and what it means within different contexts. We will share strategies we use to help individuals better cope with their ongoing recovery and also recovery strategies we use and teach to improve physical readiness.

This article will take you through a linear progression very similar to how I approach lower extremity injuries in the clinic. It is imperative to master the fundamentals before working on highly skilled or sports like movements. This progression is inspired by the 'Powers Program' which is an evidenced-based exercise progression developed by Dr. Chris Powers, PT, PHD from the University of Southern California. This program will begin with non-weight bearing isometric holds, don't let these exercises fool you they can still be challenging! We then progress to static double leg weight-bearing exercises then guide you into single leg exercises; we end this lower body exercise program with double leg dynamic strengthening movements. ย Part two of this article will progress you into single leg strengthening, plyometrics, agility movements, then returning to your desired sport!

The swissball hamstring curl is hands down the best knee dominant hamstring exercise to program for rehab and performance goals alike due to the ability to make easy and practical regressions. You can change the swissball height, limit how far to roll the swissball out, dig your heels harder or lighter into the swissball, or even perform just one part of the curl to focus on just the concentric or eccentric portion of the exercise. Strengthening the hamstrings are extremely important for the prevention of hamstring strains and risk reduction for ACL injuries. This article will show you how to level up your swissball hamstring curls and bulletproof your hammies for life!

Osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee is an alternative to joint replacement that may be used to treat a young and healthy population with symptomatic cartilage defects. The defect may be identified by MRI and/or arthroscopy. When conservative management has failed, a diagnostic arthroscopy is indicated to asses the location, size, and severity of the defect(s). These findings determine what method is best suited for cartilage restoration. Osteochondral allograft transplantation is indicated for large lesions that have affected the cartilage and subchondral (beneath cartilage) bone. Osteochondral allografts are composed of fresh donor tissue and are procured from tissue banks that follow strict safety guidelines. This article will take you through a case study demonstrating an arthroscopic evaluation, cartilage transplant, and a sample phase 1 protocol for this procedure!

Lunges are one of the most commonly performed exercises in rehab and general fitness alike - and for good reason. You are able to target different muscle groups or movement patterns just simply by changing up lunge directions from forward, to backwards, to sideways, or even into a curtsey squat. In this article, we're going to dissect one of the easiest ways to spice up your lunges by simply changing directions.

We interviewed renown orthopedic surgeon Dr. Nima Mehran to talk all about all things related to the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL. With over 200,000 ACL injuries per year and over half of those injured going to go surgery, the ACL is a hot topic within the performance and health fields alike. But what is the ACL? What does the ACL do? Do you need surgery after an ACL injury? We answered all those questions and more in this fantastic interview!

Orthopedic surgeons and physical therapists work hand in hand to deliver the best possible care to their patients. We both work in the field of orthopedic and sports and one of the most prevalent injuries we see are injuries to the meniscus. For that reason, we teamed up with a fellowship-trained and board-certified orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Nima Mehran (@drnimamehran), to give you the most straightforward answers to all of your burning questions about the meniscus. What is it? Do I have a tear? Do I need surgery? What is rehab like? We answer all of that and more in this multi-disciplinary and collaborative interview and article!

So you want to change running form? It is not uncommon for runners to explore changing how they run. Whether it's exploring different training methods, switching shoes, or adjusting how their foot contacts the ground - some runners will try anything to improve performance and minimize pain and injury risk. In this article, you will learn common running forms, running specific exercises, when shoes matter, and how to change running form safely.