Don't miss any of the latest [P]Rehab content

Sign up below to get our latest content emailed to you when released!

The natural design of the hip allows it to serve as the key to foundational movement! It is a ball and socket joint, similar to the shoulder which allows it to be extremely mobile. However, in addition to its exceptional mobility, the hips are responsible for giving us a base of weight bearing capabilities to perform complex movements such as walking, swinging a golf club, squatting to pick up objects, dancing, etc., as it also serves as a key stabilizer. If the hips become stiff our movement options become limited! The purpose of this [P]Rehab Clinical Pearl is to enhance your understanding of how to facilitate long-term improvements in hip mobility either for yourself, or for your patients. There will be a series of exercises from our exercise library that you can visualize as we discuss hip mobility throughout this post. You won't want to miss this hip mobility clinical pearl.

The bridge is probably the single most prescribed exercise by physios...it seems that the bridge exercise is ubiquitous with physical therapy and rehab. As you may be suspecting, we think this is a pretty bad thing! Yes - the bridge is in fact a decent exercise that can help groove a hip hinge movement pattern and can be the starting place for a host of pathologies ranging from the lumbar spine all the way to the foot and ankle. But that doesn't mean that our clients need to perform 3 sets of 10 bridges for months on end during the course of their rehab! Our exercise library has tons of exercises to help groove the horizontal hip hinge movement pattern, starting from the basic supine bridge all the way to a loaded barbell hip thrust.ย Follow along in this clinical pearl as we discuss bridge exercise progressions for rehabilitation!

Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is the third most common condition seen clinically and likely to be the number one mispronounced diagnosis! RCRSP is a complex condition surrounding a complex joint. We have over 70 orthopedic clinical tests for the shoulder joint and spend countless hours learning them trying to identify exactly what is causing this pain. Are these tests able to give us that information? In short, no and we will explain why later. The term RCRSP was born as an umbrella term encompassing subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. As complex as the joint and condition is,ย we hope to help you find simple solutions!ย In this post we will take you through tips/assessments/progressions that you will find in the [P]Rehab exercise library. The goal is to ensure the patients you are working with have fully prepared their shoulder complex to take on the demands of their environment!ย 

Are you considering more medicine ball exercises, AKA med ball exercises, in your routine but aren't sure what to do or how to proceed? Perhaps you've seen some cool medicine ball exercises going down in your gym and on social media. Maybe you've come across some great deals online for med balls, which might be a nice addition to your home gym but you want to make sure you know how to use them! With that being said, understanding the purpose behind the different applications of medicine ball exercises will help you decide exactly how to begin when you pick up that med ball! Continue reading to learn how to determine the best medicine ball exercises for you!

Have you ever had tingling in your hands or feet, or a burning, shooting sensation down your arm? If so, you may be dealing with nerve related pain, which can be quite discomforting. When we think of enhancing our mobility, we often think of "tight muscles" or "stiff joints", right? Ah, I gotta loosen up my low back, or I need to release my hip flexors. Yes these are all great examples of how we attack mobility deficits; however, we need to ensure that with any mobility program we do not miss an often forgotten integral piece: The Nervous System! Both our central nervous system (CNS), which consists of our brain and spinal cord, as well as our peripheral nervous system (PNS), the nerves that lie outside the CNS, each are intimately associated with our body movements and function. In this article, we are going to explain the basics behind nerve pain, and how to relieve it with neurodynamics!

Americans consume a largeย majority of the worldโ€™s opioids. Approximately 80% of the global opioid supply is consumed in the United States, a country that represents a mere 5% of the global population. There were approximately 300 million pain prescriptions written in the US in 2015 equating to a $24 billion market. While we seem to know a fair amount about pain from the financial side, the actual science behind pain is still somewhat of an enigma. Let's take a closer lookย at pain science.

This article is going to be a little different than our usual format. Rather than highlighting an exercise, answering a rehab question, or breaking down complex pathology, this article is going to focus on how to build and maintain good habits. Our goal as physical therapists is almost always to change a patient's habits in some way. Regardless of what has led a patient into physical therapy or to starting a [P]Rehab program, their goal is often to decrease pain, increase function, and reach their body's full potential, which typically happens by a change in habits! As the new year approaches and many people consider their New Year's Resolutions, I thought this guidance would be particularly timely.ย  Atomic Habits by James Clear is a New York Times bestseller that highlights some simple strategies to build and maintain good habits while eliminating bad ones. This article will highlight some of these strategies along with their application to fitness and rehab. We are here to discuss everything related to atomic exercise habits!

Ankle sprains...let's face it. Most of us have had at least one in our lifetime. When you hear ankle sprain, you envision your foot rolling out when stepping on an uneven surface or missing a step down a flight of stairs. Both of these examples are known as a lateral ankle sprain, which account for up to 85-90% of all ankle sprains. These are much more common than other ankle sprains due to the innate mechanism of injury that is more likely to occur in this plane of movement,ย  as well as the weaker soft tissue structures on the outside versus inside of the ankle. However, other ankle sprains do still happen! High ankle sprains are a fairly common injury that is more common in athletics and collision activities. It is important to learn how to rehab a high ankle sprain because it is going to look different than your typical lateral ankle sprain rehab. Follow along as we discuss how to rehab a high ankle sprain!

What is pain and where does it come from? Pain is an output from the brain, it is a real experience that is always unique to that individual, and is dependent on meaning, which is always context-dependent. It relies on biology, ecology, psychology, and sociology! Furthermore, the output of pain depends on past experiences, perspectives, the internal and external environment, emotions, and predictions. Even though it is an output from the brain, pain can be experienced anywhere in the body regardless of the presence or absence of tissue or structural damage. But is pain really all your head then? In this article, we will break down this simple yet complex question to help you better understand where pain comes from as well as pain science!

If youโ€™ve ever been to a gym where people are lifting weights, youโ€™ve likely seen people wearing weightlifting belts. This begs the question - why are weightlifting belts and exercises paired together? Why do some people only use weightlifting belts with certain exercises versus some people wear weightlifting belts with every exercise? The biggest questions - how do they work, do they actually help you lift more weight, and do they make you โ€œsaferโ€ or prevent injury?ย  In this article, we will explore some of these questions, share our opinions, and let you decide whether a weightlifting belt would be beneficial to your training or not!