Hip

Have you ever strained your hamstring before? Youโ€™re not alone! Hamstring strain injuries are among the most common acute musculoskeletal injury in the United States. Athletes who participate in track and field, soccer, and football are especially prone to these injuries given the sprinting demands of these sports. One study found that over a 10-year span in the NFL, the occurrence of hamstring strains was second only to knee sprains. The average number of days lost for athletes with hamstring strains ranged anywhere from 8 to 25 days, which equated to missing up to 4 NFL games or 25% of the season. Even more concerning is that hamstring re-injury rates are extremely high, especially during the first 2 weeks after return to sport. In fact, over 1/3 of hamstring injuries will reoccur during this time.

Everyone has a slightly different bony anatomy. Whether itโ€™s a longer femur, bent shin (tibial torsion), or a rotated hip socket (acetabular retroversion), your anatomy, in addition to your functional goals, should ultimately drive squat depth. So how deep or low should you squat?ย From an injury prevention and biomechanical perspective, there is only one thing that should matter โ€“ posterior pelvic tilt.

It seems as if the fitness industry not too long ago was engulfed in the newest and latest machine. However, the recent pendulum of this industry has been going back to the minimalist end of the spectrum giving attention to calisthenic exercises. This has led to the popularity with exercises such as the Pistol squat AKA the single leg squat. This exercise is a complex movement that is overall encompassing of strength, motor control, and range of motion (particularly at the ankle). This series will break down why you are not able to pistol squat as well as how to have the proper balance of strength, motor control, and mobility to perform this complex movement! Without the proper recipe, you may find yourself falling right on your butt time after time.

This 3-video post will be covering differ lunge variations. We will cover:

โžก๏ธ Prehab considerations for multi-directional lunges โžก๏ธ Lunges variations for power development โžก๏ธ Our favorite lunge combo If you donโ€™t already include some lunge variation into your lower body training, hopefully by the end of this article we will have convinced you to not only do so, but also gaveย you some creative ideas on variations that best suit your goals!

In the words of the glute guyย @bretcontreras1 himself "deadlifting oozes strength and functionality. There's something to bending over, grabbing a hold of heavy weight, and standing up with it that makes you feel like a primal powerhouse." Deadlift variations are simply loaded hip hinge patterns, which is an essential movement pattern to master not only in the gym, but also in day to day function.

In particular, rhe Romanian Deadlift, or RDL, is one of our favorite variations and we'll be sharing our top 5 favorite and best RDL variations for [P]Rehab and strength and conditioning goals alike.

The landmine has got to be one of the most underutilized, but highly effective pieces of equipment for adding a challenge and variation into your core movements (push, pull, hip hinge, etc). Even if you don't have a landmine available, you can use a corner of your gym (please use towels so you don't scuff up the walls). Here is a list of our top five favorite landmine exercises.

The team at Accelerate Sports Performance and Training Slate will be discussing the importance of specific muscle activation prior to strength training. More activation = better recruitment = GAINS.ย Activation techniques can be used in combination with strength exercises in a unilateral or bilateral fashion. In the following posts, they hope to spark some mental juices on how to approach activation exercises for your various lifts, while taking into account some very commonly seen issues in strength training as it relates to arthrokinematic and osteokinematic movement, or natural movement in general.

Stretching after a workout should be a stable of any recovery program. Tight muscles can lead to muscle imbalances, abnormal movement patterns, and muscle spasms. However, as with any movement, there is an optimal way to stretch your hamstrings. Proper hamstring stretching does not mean that you should be feeling a stretch in your foot!

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak.

The single leg Romanian deadlift is one of my absolute favorite exercises. Itโ€™s a whole body, complete, functional exercise that can be used for rehabilitation, as well as strength and conditioning purposes alike. While not utilized as commonly in strength and conditioning realms, itโ€™s quite a popular exercise in the physical therapy world due to its ability to work the entire lower extremity posterior chain, while simultaneously challenging oneโ€™s balance.