Injuries are unavoidable. $HiT happens! Whether it's your knee, ankle, or hip, you need to follow a systematic return to running protocol to ensure that you've built up the adequate strength to run. Getting back to running after an injury without a plan is like running a marathon without building up your mileage. It puts your body at increased risk of future re-injury! Follow these easy steps and you'll be back to running in no time! This article will simplify how to get back to running.

The general population is spending more and more time in sedentary jobs/positions, sitting down hunched over a computer desk for hours on end. This is leading to adaptive changes that are not in favor of our posterior chain musculature.! The hamstrings and glute's are the body's primary movers, in addition to giving great aesthetics. Therefore, this article will focus on the posterior chain by opening the front of the body whilst strengthening the back of the body. Weight training can be such an efficient and versatile training modality, as you can use it to increase strength, build lean muscle, enhance the power to weight ratio, activate key stabilizers, and improve dynamic mobility. This article will show you the absolute best fundamental lower body exercises!

Hamstring exercises should be a staple in every person's training program. They are a crucial muscle group that is imperative for daily function. The play an important role on a wide spectrum from simple activity to more powerful exercises! To warm up your hamstrings, a healthy dose of dynamic mobility, muscle setting and strengthening, as well as nervous system priming is what creates an excellent warm up routine. Not to worry, you don't have to feel limited to the traditional and boring standing hamstrings stretch and leg curls. In this article, you will learn how to warm up your hamstrings with a variety of excellent exercises targeting mobility, nervous system activation, and muscle activation!

Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics when performing a squat? Did you know there are different ways to squat by using a knee strategy versus a hip strategy? A knee strategy has been shown to increase the risk of tibiofemoral joint injuries, patellofemoral joint pain, patella tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome. Utilizing a hip strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a knee vs. a hip strategy, and how to fix knee pain with squatting!

Step up and step down exercise variations are amazingly simple, yet truly effective in lower extremity rehab. Step-ups will always be a staple drill in rehabilitation and strength and conditioning programs. Considering the unilateral, weight-bearing nature of the step-up, it effectively challenges recruitment patterns analogous to those encountered during routine activities of daily living and sport. Adding variability to the classic step ups and downs is key to movement proficiency and developing a well-rounded athlete. In addition, the step down is a great way to promote eccentric strength in our lower body, as well as joint stability and control with movements that translate to our activities of daily living as well. In this article, we are going to show you how to master step up and step down variations!

Banded side stepsโ€ฆ.ooooh so fancy and sexy! ๐ŸคฃBut really, there is an over-obsession with the banded side step exercise in the fitness community, yet most don't really need to do this exercise if they are already healthy and strong as the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for the gluteus medius in the exercise is not even at an adequate level for true strength gains (<40% MVIC). However, in the rehab setting, the banded side step and all of its variations (e.g. monster walks) are great for re-training proper movement patterns and neuromuscular control. Furthermore, bands are a great way to increase the MVIC in the exercise and challenge the patient even further. But all of this is only true if you perform this exercise correctly! In this article, you will learn our fool-proof method to perform the banded side step exercise correctly!

This article will feature 5 different phases of a dynamic basketball prehab warm up. The dynamic warm up will be broken up into dynamic mobility, glute activation, core activation, agility activation, and plyometric activation. Each of these 5 phases plays an important role in improving basketball performance.

If you have played in various sports such as ice hockey or soccer before, you are probably familiar with tweaking your groin muscle (adductor). A groin strain is an injury to the muscle-tendon unit of the adductor tendon or its insertion into the pubic bone. The reason groin strains are so common during hockey and soccer is that it requires such a strong eccentric contraction (muscle lengthening against gravity) of the adductor musculature. Other sports that require twisting, turning, kicking, and sprinting, such as tennis, rugby, football (American), basketball, and running have also been associated with groin strains. Moreover, adductor strains may happen with other activities involving general exercise if our body is not adequately prepared for various movements. Although common, there are plenty of ways to prehab your groin in an effort to prevent adductor injuries! This article will give you actionable exercises on how to prehab your groin strain!

While our focus is on prehab, such as finding the weak links in your movement system and addressing them through specifically targeted exercises, we are big advocates of barbell training and we do so regularly. That being said, not everyone is a fan of (or comfortable with) getting under a barbell - especially in the rehabilitation setting. So if you are unable to get your clients or patients under the barbell and are looking for exercises that elicit similar electromyography (EMG) activity to the traditional back squat, look no further than the rear foot elevated split squat aka the Bulgarian split squat! In this article, we are covering everything you need to know about Bulgarian Split Squats including the why, alignment, set-up, and variations!

The bridge is a versatile exercise that can be used for developing great gluteal muscle function. Individuals with back and hip pathologies are often taught to perform bridges in the hook-lying position, elevating the pelvis off the floor. This exercise is particularly useful for facilitating pelvic motions and strengthening the low back and hip extensors. In addition, O'Sullivan et al. have demonstrated the bridges ability to enhance motor control of the lumbo-pelvic region. This article will help you improve the bridge exercise!