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Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) became very popular in the fitness, rehab, and sports medicine world a couple of years ago and it is here to stay as it has many applicable uses. FRC focuses on improving mobility. Mobility, in an FRC sense, is defined as strength and control in order to expand upon usable ranges of motion, articular resilience (i.e. load-bearing capacity), and overall joint health. Adding FRC principles into your training and prehab routine can be a huge game-changer! This article will provide you an intro to FRC principles provided with exercise examples that we have included in a variety of our prehab programs.

21st-century golf training is no longer just hitting the range or putting green. It has evolved into functional movement training with mobility, control, strength, and speed at its centerpiece. Not only are professional golfers acknowledging the benefits of this type of training, but so is the average golfer who is now reconsidering what they're doing during their workouts. In this article, you will learn the best exercises for golf!

Posterior pelvic tilt, squats, and butt winks - you've got questions and we got answers. This is an awesome topic we are pumped to help you all understand! Everyone has a slightly different boney anatomy, thus we're going to look a bit differently when we move. Whether itโ€™s a longer femur, bent shin (tibial torsion), or a rotated hip socket (acetabular retroversion), not everyone is going to have the exact same anatomical make-up. With that being said, your unique anatomy, in addition to your functional goals, should ultimately drive your specific squat depth. Not everyone is going to squat the same way, and that is ok! So how deep or low should you squat? From an injury prevention and biomechanical perspective, there is only one thing that should matter sometimes, and that is the posterior pelvic tilt. In this article, we are going to help you understand how to control your pelvic movements during the squat to avoid a concept known as 'butt winking' if that is the goal,ย  and also teach you how much depth you should have when squatting!

Deadlift variations are simply loaded hip hinge patterns, which is an essential movement pattern to master. There are many benefits to deadlifting, which include improving core stability, improving strength of the lower extremities, improving strength of the lower back, and promoting a more optimal functional movement pattern that is very translatable to activities of daily living. In fact, whether you may know it or not, you potentially deadlift multiple times a day! A few examples include picking up your laundry basket from the floor, lifting up your grandchild, or performing the actual exercise itself in the gym! In particular, the Romanian Deadlift, or RDL, is one of our favorite variations and we'll be sharing our favorite and best RDL variations for [P]Rehab and strength and conditioning goals alike.

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak. Moreover, we need to ensure that our hips are not only strong but stable! In this article, we are going to show you the essentials of how to improve hip stability with prehab exercises!

Medial knee collapse, also known as knee valgus, is when the knee collapses or falls inward during any sort of weight-bearing activity, like a squat, during gait, or during sport-specific movements like cutting. Knee valgus is characterized by hip adduction and hip internal rotation in a flexed hip position. This position of the knee is most commonly associated with a non-contact mechanism of injury of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and occurs in the running or jumping athlete during the deceleration phase of a cutting movement. The gluteus maximus plays an interesting role in medial knee collapse and can help with preventing knee valgus. In this article, we will show you how to prevent knee valgus with gluteus maximus targeted exercises!