Do you have pain that is on the outside of one of your hips? Does it bother you when you are laying on your side or trying to sleep at night? If you have answered yes to one of these questions, you may be dealing with either hip bursitis or a gluteal tendinopathy. Both of these conditions can be difficult to differentiate in regards to their symptoms and clinical presentation; however, it is important to understand the differences between them both. In this article, we will help you understand why you may be having lateral hip pain, and what you can do to help manage your symptoms.

The gluteus medius or glute med for short is a muscle on the lateral portion of the hip that is crucial for a variety of activities of daily living. When we try to perform higher-level activities like weight lifting and sports activities, this muscle becomes even more important! Why? The glute med is so important because it is vital to our ability to stabilize ourselves during single leg balance. While we might not realize it, we live on 1 leg a lot. Walking, for instance, is the act of repeatedly balancing on a single leg over and over again. Strengthening the glute med can also help to resolve hip pain, low back pain, and even pain at your knee or foot! This article will take a closer look at what the glute med does as well as some of the best exercises for training this muscle.

Progressing exercises is a systematic and organized approach that should be individualized to each person depending on their health, fitness level, and specific goals. The great part about exercise is that everyone is able to start somewhere! No matter what that starting point is for you, the only direction from there is UP. In this article, we will discuss a linear progression of how to progress lower extremity injuries in the clinic. It is imperative to master the fundamentals before working on highly skilled movements. This progression is inspired by the 'Powers Program', which is an evidenced-based lower body exercise progression developed by Dr. Chris Powers, DPT, Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (USC). This program will begin with non-weight bearing isometric holds, don't let these exercises fool you - they are extremely challenging! We then progress to static double leg weight-bearing exercises, followed by single-leg exercises, and finish the exercise progressionย with dynamic strengthening movements. Follow along in this article to learn how to progress lower body exercises!

FAI (Femoroacetabular Impingement) Syndrome is a condition in which the hip structure has been altered, either genetically, or more commonly through physical stresses.ย  When someone is diagnosed with FAI, they will present with a CAM Impingement (thickening on the femoral neck), a PINCER impingement (deepening of the hip socket), or a combination of both IN CONJUNCTION with pain/symptoms. It is not uncommon for labral tears to be present with FAI Syndrome as well. This article will focus on exercises for FAI syndrome that individuals can use to manage their associated hip pain!

The hip thrust has been increasing in popularity within the last decade. It is arguably the most effective movement to target the glutes. This article will demonstrate how to appropriately perform a hip thrust in addition to showing you many variations to improve the size and strength of your gluteal muscles. When looking at the literature we see how vital gluteal muscle function is in providing knee, pelvis, and trunk stability with the goal of [P]Rehabbing your lower quarter. This article will show you how to master the hip thrust. Your glutes will love you after performing these exercises! Learn how to master the hip thrust exercise!

The stork exercise (also referred to as the captain morgan exercise), is one of our all-time favorites for gluteus medius activation and neural priming prior to exercise. Not only is it already in a functional weight-bearing position, but you can ramp up as much activation as you want by pushing harder and harder into the wall. Follow along in this article as we show you stork exercise variations for gluteus medius activation, as well as other wall-supported hip exercises!

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak. Moreover, we need to ensure that our hips are not only strong but stable! In this article, we are going to show you the essentials of how to improve hip stability with prehab exercises!