Think about that last ankle sprain or wrist sprain you suffered, what did you do  immediately following the injury? Probably ice, add a little compression, and elevate that body part. Great idea, you did the right thing, but it’s time for the therapy world to shift away from the acronym RICE and shift towards the POLICE Principle for injury recovery and tissue healing. Haven’t heard this acronym yet? Want to learn how to speed up the recovery process? Want to learn why rice/rest doesn't work for injuries? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

Limited ankle dorsiflexion has been associated with a whole host of lower extremity injuries including plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, calf strains, shin splints, patellofemoral pain, IT band syndrome, and even ACL injuries. Additionally, limited ankle mobility manifests itself as a functional limitation in every day tasks such as walking, negotiating stairs, and even in athletic endeavors such as achieving proper squat depth or cutting. While the problems associated with limited ankle mobility are well known, the solutions on how to increase ankle dorsiflexion are not. Who else has spent hours and hours stretching without any increase in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion? In this article, we're going to cover everything you need to know about ankle mobility. From defining what ankle mobility is, why you need it, how to assess it, and most importantly, how to improve it! Hang on tight for the best ankle mobility exercises to improve ankle dorsiflexion that you can do from the comforts of your home to decrease your risk of lower extremity injury, improve your functional abilities, and enhance your athletic performance!

So you want to change running form? It is not uncommon for runners to explore changing how they run. Whether it's exploring different training methods, switching shoes, or adjusting how their foot contacts the ground - some runners will try anything to improve performance and minimize pain and injury risk. In this article, you will learn common running forms, running specific exercises, when shoes matter, and how to change running form safely.

It seems as if the fitness industry not too long ago was engulfed in the newest and latest machine. However, the recent pendulum of this industry has been going back to the minimalist end of the spectrum giving attention to calisthenic exercises. This has led to the popularity of exercises such as the Pistol squat AKA a modification of the single-leg squat. This exercise is a complex movement that requires strength, motor control, and range of motion (particularly at the ankle). This series will help you identify why you might not able to pistol squat as well as how to gain the proper balance of strength, motor control, and mobility to perform this complex movement! Follow along in this article to learn how to pistol squat!