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A concussion is a mild form of traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is considered part of the mild spectrum because there is no observable pathology; meaning that on standard imaging, you cannot see a concussion injury. Concussion rather is an injury that results in changes to how the brain functions – it is a functional injury. Concussions don’t necessarily come from hits to the head. Concussions are due to the acceleration of the brain inside the skull. Although a hit to the head is the most likely cause, you can also sustain a concussion – this acceleration of the brain - from a hit to the body, or a fall, or a whiplash-type mechanism. A concussion is treatable; in this article @Concussion_Doc will break down the science behind a concussion in addition to effective treatments for persistent concussion symptoms!

We interviewed two of the leading orthopedic surgeons in the country, Dr. Nikhil Verma and Dr. Jorge Chahla of Midwest Orthopedics at Rush to discuss biologics. Biologics like PRP, stem cells, corticosteroid injections, and hyaluronic acid are all the rage in medicine right now - and for good reason. Instead of having to reconstruct or repair damaged or torn tissues in the body through surgery, what if we could help relieve pain and improve function with a minimal invasion biologic injection? That is the promise of biologic injections. While significantly more research needs to be done to better understand how to best deliver biologics and what patients they may benefit the most, the future is very promising. As physical therapists, we will always be advocates of more conservative measures like physical therapy or biologic injections prior to more invasive options like surgery when warranted to potentially give our patients the upper hand in their rehab. Keep reading for this beast of a guest-article by Dr. Jorge Chahla!

Thank you to all the support you guys have given us in 2018. We have been hard at work with extremely exciting projects going live this upcoming year! Stay tuned. This article showcase the 6 most popular Episodes of 2018. Serratus Anterior https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCHGG140HrEWant to check out our entire...

If you're in any which way connected to the rehabilitation, sports medicine, or athletic performance worlds, you've probably heard the word "blood flow restriction" or "BFR" at some point. A growing body of evidence now supports the use of using blood flow restriction combined with low-load resistance training to enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscles. Blood flow restriction training utilizes the application of an inflatable pneumatic cuff or wraps around a limb to limit the amount of blood flow available to the exercising muscle. The goal is to fully occlude venous blood flow out of the exercising limb and restrict a certain percentage of blood flow into the exercising limb. 

Americans consume a large majority of the world’s opioids. Approximately 80% of the global opioid supply is consumed in the United States, a country that represents a mere 5% of the global population. There were approximately 300 million pain prescriptions written in the US in 2015 equating to a $24 billion market. While we seem to know a fair amount about pain from the financial side, the actual science behind pain is still somewhat of an enigma. Let's take a closer look at pain science.

Personalized blood flow restriction training is a training strategy (or an exercise modality) that involves exercising at low intensities (i.e. 20-35% 1-RM) while occluding venous blood flow out of a limb and restricting arterial blood flow into a limb by using a Doppler controlled computer tourniquet. This type of training is accomplished by wrapping off the proximal portion of a limb. In the upper extremity this is done at the level of the deltoid tuberosity, while in the lower extremity this is performed at the level of the greater trochanter of the femur. As future healthcare providers, we recommend using an FDA approved personalized tourniquet system to perform personalized blood flow restriction training (like SmartCuffs and Owens Recovery Science) as opposed to other methods such as knee wraps and/or voodoo bands.

This “Clean Series” will delve into the clean through the eyes of a lifter en route to becoming a scholar. We will be discussing a broad spectrum of clean faults and misnomers, along with tried-and-true cues and corrective exercises that can be used for yourself, or your athletes. The clean is an excellent tool for any trainer or rehab specialist alike to build explosiveness, dynamic power, jumping and landing mechanics, and fast-twitch muscle activation in athletes/patients. If you are looking to add some tools to the tool belt this clean article is for you!

There is a huge misconception in the fitness and rehab worlds. Far too often, we label exercises as a good exercise or bad exercise for all athletes. Many preach that squats are a must in every athlete’s fitness program and exercises such as behind the neck press’ should never be performed…when in fact, many of these movements can be great for athletic performance. These beliefs are from years of dogma surrounding certain movements. But in reality, any exercise can be a bad exercise if an athlete lacks the requite mobility & motor control. Let's put this bad exercise myth to bed!