Quadriceps inhibition or the inability to feel/activate your quadriceps after major knee surgeries like ACL reconstruction can be a very frustrating early on in the rehabilitation process. How is it possible that you can't squeeze your quad?! Luckily for you, we'll show you our top 7 cues and expert tips to increase your quadriceps activation and get it firing again!

Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics when performing a squat? Did you know there is a difference between a knee strategy and a hip strategy? A Knee Strategy has been shown to increase risk of Tibiofemoral joint injury, Patellofemoral joint pain, Patella Tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome. Utilizing a Hip Strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a Knee vs. a Hip Strategy, and how to fix knee pain with squatting!

Step ups and downs are amazingly simple, yet truly effective in lower extremity rehab. Adding variability to the classic step ups and downs is key to movement proficiency and developing a well-rounded athlete. Have you tried these step up variations before?!

Banded side steps….ooooh so fancy and sexy! 🤣But really, there is an over-obsession with the banded side step exercise in the fitness community and most don't really need to do this exercise if they are already healthy and strong as the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for the gluteus medius in the exercise is not even at an adequate level for true strength gains (<40% MVIC). However, in the rehab setting, the banded side step and all its variations (e.g. monster walks) are great for re-training proper movement patterns and neuromuscular control. Furthermore, bands are a great way to increase the MVIC in the exercise and challenge the patient even further.

This article will feature 5 different phases of a dynamic basketball prehab warm up. The dynamic warm up will be broken up into dynamic mobility, glute activation, core activation, agility activation, and plyometric activation. Each of these 5 phases plays an important role in improving basketball performance.

While our focus is on prehab, such as finding the weak links in your movement system and addressing them through specifically targeted exercises, we are big advocates of barbell training and we do so regularly. That being said, not everyone is a fan of (or comfortable with) getting under a barbell - especially in the rehabilitation setting. So if you are unable to get your clients or patients under the barbell and are looking for exercises that elicit similar electromyography (EMG) activity to the traditional back squat, look no further than the rear foot elevated split squat aka the Bulgarian split squat! In this article, we are covering everything you need to know about Bulgarian Split Squats including the why, alignment, set-up, and variations!

The Bridge is a versatile exercise that can be used for developing great Gluteal muscle function. Individuals with back and hip pathologies are often taught to perform bridges in the hook-lying position, elevating the pelvis off the floor. This exercise is particularly useful for facilitating pelvic motions and strengthening the low back and hip extensors. In addition, O'Sullivan et al. have demonstrated the bridges ability to enhance motor control of the lumbo-pelvic region. This article will help you Perfect Your Bridge!

So you've been trying to get back into shape and just when you caught stride your knees started to hurt, now what!? There are a few key elements with handling this issue that include optimal exercise selection, smart programming, and activity modification. Here is a comprehensive approach on how to stay active and manage your knee pain regarding different physical activities including running and hiking.

When beginning the transition to plyometrics, I always want to make sure my athletes can first control regressed movements, positions of instability, and demonstrate good deceleration control in all three planes in a SLOW AND CONTROLLED MANNER. This is an absolute prerequisite before I ask them to generate power (speed component) and change directions (agility component), especially in reaction to an external stimulus (ie an opposing player or ball). Assessing and training deceleration control in all three planes is absolutely vital for the athlete, as no sport is truly one dimensional.

BLACK FRIDAY SALE: Buy one, get one 50% off
LETS GO!
close-image