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If you're in any which way connected to the rehabilitation, sports medicine, or athletic performance worlds, you've probably heard the word "blood flow restriction" or "BFR" at some point. A growing body of evidence now supports the use of using blood flow restriction combined with low-load resistance training to enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscles. Blood flow restriction training utilizes the application of an inflatable pneumatic cuffย or wraps around a limb to limit the amount ofย blood flowย available to the exercising muscle. The goal is to fully occlude venous blood flow out of the exercising limb and restrict a certain percentage of blood flow into the exercising limb.ย 

Learn how to master Bulgarian split squats! Whether you call them BSS, rear leg elevated split squats, or rear leg elevated lunges - we are covering everything you need to know about this exercise including why you should do it, alignment, set-up, and variations!

The Bridge is a versatile exercise that can be used for developing great Gluteal muscle function.ย Individuals with back and hip pathologies are often taught to perform bridges in the hook-lying position, elevating the pelvis off the floor. This exercise is particularly useful for facilitating pelvic motions and strengthening the low back and hip extensors. In addition, O'Sullivan et al. have demonstrated the bridges ability to enhance motor control of the lumbo-pelvic region. This article will help you Perfect Your Bridge!

So you've been trying to get back into shape and just when you caught stride your knees started to hurt, now what!? There are a few key elements with handling this issue that include optimal exercise selection, smart programming, and activity modification. Here is a comprehensive approach on how to stay active and manage your knee pain regarding different physical activities including running and hiking.

Sedentary lifestyles are an undesirable hallmark of modern society, affecting a significant proportion of the population. Prolonged sitting (a form of sedentary behavior) has progressively become the norm with computerization in the workplace. These developments are not only detrimental for physiological health and well-being with rising levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, but also musculoskeletal health. Recent research findings have found an association between prolonged sitting (>8 hours a day) and increased neck-shoulder and low back pain. Sedentary behaviors may induce a relatively stiff thoracic spine contributing towards the dysfunction in the adjacent spinal regions. This article will provide you exercises to improve your thoracic spine mobility!

The stork exercise is one of our all-time favorites for gluteus medius activation and neural priming prior to exercise. Not only is it already in a functional weight-bearing position, but you can ramp up as much activation as you want by pushing harder and harder into the wall!

When beginning the transition to plyometrics, I always want to make sure my athletes can first control regressed movements, positions of instability, and demonstrate good deceleration control in all three planes in a SLOW AND CONTROLLED MANNER. This is an absolute prerequisite before I ask them to generate power (speed component) and change directions (agility component), especially in reaction to an external stimulus (ie an opposing player or ball). Assessing and training deceleration control in all three planes is absolutely vital for the athlete, as no sport is truly one dimensional.

Slings (also referred to as chains and/or loops) are a functional component of the musculoskeletal system. If we think of our torso as a core cylinder, there are multiple slings that wrap around the cylinder in different orientations. The cylinder depends on strength and balance from the slings to provide a stable foundation. This article will cover a brief overview of the sling systems, as well as cover the anterior and posterior oblique sling exercise progressions and assessment!