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Got a pain in the front of your shins that just does not want to go away? Have you been running a lot or playing a lot of sports that involve jumping activity? If so, you may be dealing with what is known as 'shin splints'. This lower leg injury often due to overuse is a difficult one to rehabilitate for many reasons, one of which being its obscurity. Shin splints, which is better known as 'medial tibial stress syndrome', is an injury more common in endurance athletes such as runners, as well as athletes involved in jumping sports such as basketball or volleyball, who are placing large amounts of stress with high volume through their lower extremities. In this article, we are going to show you the best shin splints exercises that will get you out of pain and back to your activities!

Think about that last ankle sprain or wrist sprain you suffered, what did you do  immediately following the injury? Probably ice, add a little compression, and elevate that body part. Great idea, you did the right thing, but it’s time for the therapy world to shift away from the acronym RICE and shift towards the POLICE Principle for injury recovery and tissue healing. Haven’t heard this acronym yet? Want to learn how to speed up the recovery process? Want to learn why rice/rest doesn't work for injuries? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

There is a problem with ACL Rehab. If you tore your ACL, were you told that surgery was your only option? Were you told that after having surgery to address a torn ACL your risk of re-tear is twice as high as the population at large? Were you told that returning to sport within a year after surgery significantly increases your risk of re-tear? Did a physical therapist ever explain to you the importance of regaining quad strength and using that to dictate your return to activities like running, jumping, and playing sports, rather than just time alone? Did anyone tell you that your chances of developing osteoarthritis increase substantially after an ACL tear, whether you have surgery or not? If your answer to any of the above questions was no, then the current system is doing you a disservice. This article will take a look at what is missing in our current model for ACL rehab and how technology can help you safely return to sport and protect the long term health of your knee.

A common problem in distance runners and change-of-direction sports like football, soccer and hockey, proximal hamstring tendinopathy is a pain in the butt (literally)! Characterized by deep, localized pain over the ischial tuberosity (the large, bony protuberances/bumps on your bottom), this often gets worse with running, lunging, squatting and sitting (1). Often challenging to initially recognize, and located in an area with lots of potential pain generators, proximal hamstring tendinopathy can truly be a bear to manage and resolve. Luckily, there are lots of conservative management options, with therapeutic exercise prescription being a top choice. If it sounds like we're hitting the mark for what you're experiencing with a high hamstring injury, or you're just interested to learn about this common injury, you've come to the right place. Read on to learn more.

If you’re a runner, you understand the importance of lacing up the shoes, putting in the miles, building up that base, and getting in a few days at the gym. While this is certainly a recipe for success, it’s not always the best recipe for success. Why? What’s the magic ingredient we are missing? Well let me ask you, when is the last time you hit the weight room and more importantly, when is the last time you lifted with an emphasis on power training to improve your speed? I stumped you, huh? Power is often that missing ingredient from a runner’s perfect training plan to improve speed and get you to the finish line quicker. Check out this blog for the best power exercises for runners to develop speed. And from this point on it's speedy miles and podium finishes!

It's a pretty common story we hear in physical therapy practice on a weekly (maybe daily) basis: "I've been told by my (insert healthcare provider here) that my hip alignment is off and my hips are out of place. Can you put them back quick before we start our session today?", "I don't think my pelvis is aligned right, my one leg feels longer than the other. Can you take a look?", or "Can you do a quick check for me? My alignment is off." I doubt it. But we should probably dive a little bit deeper than that shouldn't we? There is a ton to unpack here. To be honest, it's probably one of the most emotionally charged topics within this field. That being said, I hope I can bring some good discussion to the table today, and help provide some reassurance for you. I'll say it again, and trust I do so with a positive and optimistic demeanor (not a dismissive one): I doubt the notion that your hips really are out of alignment, and for good reason in your favor! Let's try and break this down mechanically, culturally, psychosocially and take a look from an evidence-based perspective -- visiting some pertinent literature along the way. Read on if I've caught your attention!

"Stop cracking your knuckles or you'll ruin your joints, Your joint is out and we will pop it back in." These statements or narratives seem to surround the snap, crackle, and pop of our cracking joints. History and research show us the first statement is not true and this was likely a parenting strategy to get kids to stop cracking their knuckles because parents were getting annoyed with the noise! However, the other questions remain and in this article, we will answer them along with giving the scientific rationale of what the popping sound truly is!

The biceps is a very important muscle in our upper arm that plays an integral role in our function. The muscle runs from the front of the shoulder to the elbow. It has two proximal tendon attachments to the shoulder and one insertion point at the elbow. The function of the biceps is to flex the elbow and to supinate, or rotate, the forearm into a palm up position. It also assists in shoulder flexion, helping to raise the arm forward. One of these two tendons rarely suffers from injury while the other tendon is particularly susceptible to pain, injury and associated shoulder dysfunction! In this article you'll learn why that is, as well as the risk factors, treatment, and prevention strategies to take care of that pesky biceps pain. Follow along in this article as we demonstrate some awesome biceps tendon pain exercises!