What do offensive lineman, relief pitchers, stay at home defensemen, long snappers, caddies, and the groin muscles all have in common? They are all under-appreciated but play a crucial role in their respective systems! The groin is one of the most commonly injured muscle groups in athletes, especially in rotational athletes. In this article, you will learn the importance of completing advanced groin training at the end stages of a groin strain and with specific prehab interventions in order to prevent a groin injury in the first place!

The gluteus medius or glute med for short is a muscle on the lateral portion of the hip that is crucial for a variety of activities of daily living. When we try to perform higher-level activities like weight lifting and sports activities, this muscle becomes even more important! Why? The glute med is so important because it is vital to our ability to stabilize ourselves during single leg balance. While we might not realize it, we live on 1 leg a lot. Walking, for instance, is the act of repeatedly balancing on a single leg over and over again. Strengthening the glute med can also help to resolve hip pain, low back pain, and even pain at your knee or foot! This article will take a closer look at what the glute med does as well as some of the best exercises for training this muscle.

Have you been dealing with a nagging pain in your buttock that just doesn't want to go away? You've tried everything. Ice, heat, massaging the area, but nothing is working! This annoyance of pain around the backside of your hip may be due to a condition known as 'piriformis syndrome', which is somewhat of a conundrum in the healthcare field. This condition can be a real pain in the butt, (pun intended). In this article, we will discuss piriformis syndrome, and what you can do to help relieve your pain that could be stemming from this 'condition'.

OUCH! Pain in the ball of your foot when you step down, walk, or run? Feel like there is a large pebble or rock in your shoe? Have stubborn pain on the bottom of the foot that just won’t go away? You may be experiencing a common, yet often undiagnosed condition called Morton’s neuroma. Morton’s neuroma is a benign, yet very painful condition that occurs when a nerve running in between your toes gets irritated or compressed and starts to cause discomfort. In this article, we will discuss causes and treatments for this condition, as well as give you some exercise and stretching tools to combat your pain!

Americans consume a large majority of the world’s opioids. Approximately 80% of the global opioid supply is consumed in the United States, a country that represents a mere 5% of the global population. There were approximately 300 million pain prescriptions written in the US in 2015 equating to a $24 billion market. While we seem to know a fair amount about pain from the financial side, the actual science behind pain is still somewhat of an enigma. Let's take a closer look at pain science.

The shoulder is a complicated body part. It is an extremely mobile joint that is able to move within many different planes of movement; however, as a result of its ability to move excessively, its stability may sometimes become compromised. In addition, there are other parts of our body that are required to move efficiently in sync with the shoulder in order for healthy shoulder mobility to occur. Because the shoulder is quite complex, proximal body parts are often overlooked when creating various shoulder exercise programs. The glenohumeral joint (shoulder ball-and-socket joint) sits on the scapula (shoulder blade), which moves in accord with the thoracic spine (Mid-Back). A shoulder exercise program is not comprehensive unless all components of the shoulder are addressed. This article will help you understand the various motions that must occur at the shoulder, the spine, and upper extremity as an entire unit, as well as show you excellent exercises that will guide you in how to bulletproof your shoulders!

Healthy shoulders are essential to participating in life, exercise, and recreational activities without pain or restrictions. However, healthy shoulders require maintenance and attention. Below you learn the ultimate shoulder warm-up before lifting, which includes some of our favorite mobility drills, stretches, and exercises that should be a part of everyone's shoulder maintenance.

This article is going to be a little different than our usual format. Rather than highlighting an exercise, answering a rehab question, or breaking down complex pathology, this article is going to focus on how to build and maintain good habits. Our goal as physical therapists is almost always to change a patient's habits in some way. Regardless of what has led a patient into physical therapy or to starting a [P]Rehab program, their goal is often to decrease pain, increase function, and reach their body's full potential, which typically happens by a change in habits! As the new year approaches and many people consider their New Year's Resolutions, I thought this guidance would be particularly timely.  Atomic Habits by James Clear is a New York Times bestseller that highlights some simple strategies to build and maintain good habits while eliminating bad ones. This article will highlight some of these strategies along with their application to fitness and rehab. We are here to discuss everything related to atomic exercise habits!

The scapula is one of the least congruent joints in the body. There is no bony articulation between the scapula and the thorax. This is why the scapula can move so easily, essentially it is a free-floating bone that can move into protraction/retraction, elevation/depression, anterior tilt/posterior tilt, internal/external rotation, and upward/downward rotation. We can not change the structure of this scapulothoracic joint,  however, we can improve scapular control! Scapula position is almost fully determined by the pulling of muscle groups that attach to the scapula. The scapula is the core of the upper body, this is where the force comes in through and gets distributed out of. This article will demonstrate exercises that you can do on your own to improve your scapula control.

Ankle sprains...let's face it. Most of us have had at least one in our lifetime. When you hear ankle sprain, you envision your foot rolling out when stepping on an uneven surface or missing a step down a flight of stairs. Both of these examples are known as a lateral ankle sprain, which account for up to 85-90% of all ankle sprains. These are much more common than other ankle sprains due to the innate mechanism of injury that is more likely to occur in this plane of movement,  as well as the weaker soft tissue structures on the outside versus inside of the ankle. However, other ankle sprains do still happen! High ankle sprains are a fairly common injury that is more common in athletics and collision activities. It is important to learn how to rehab a high ankle sprain because it is going to look different than your typical lateral ankle sprain rehab. Follow along as we discuss how to rehab a high ankle sprain!

Golf [P]Rehab Program Just Released! 
LETS GO!
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