Have you ever strained your hamstring before? You’re not alone! Hamstring strains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal injuries. Athletes who participate in track and field, soccer, and football are especially prone to these injuries given the sprinting demands of these sports. One study found that over a 10-year span in the NFL, the occurrence of hamstring strains was second only to knee sprains. The average number of days lost for athletes with hamstring strains ranged anywhere from 8 to 25 days, which equated to missing up to 4 NFL games or 25% of the season. Even more concerning is that hamstring re-injury rates are extremely high, especially during the first two weeks after return to sport. In fact, over 33% of hamstring reinjuries will reoccur during this time (2). But even with the extremely high reoccurrence rates, there are risk factors that can be addressed now with a proper [P]Rehab routine. In this article, we’ll break down everything you need to know about hamstring strains and the best [P]Rehab exercises for the hamstrings.

Many youth athletes spend hours in the driveway hitting turn around fade aways at the imaginary buzzer, recreating Lionel Messi’s game winning shots, or tumbling across the living room like Simone Biles. They aspire to one day make it to the top ranks as professional athletes. Some get there, some don’t, but hopefully, it leads to enjoyment of lifelong physical activity! What does it take to get to the top? What did professional athletes training look like as youth athletes? Do you need to specialize only in one sport to get there? Learn all about youth athlete sport specialization and how to train like Pros from the start!

Plyometrics exercises should be an integral part of any lower extremity rehab or injury prevention program to increase power development and to teach proper absorption movement mechanics. In the rehab realm, you could argue that it's even more important to learn how to absorb forces than to increase power development - although you will work on both through proper plyometric progressions. Absorption forces need to be progressed appropriately, as overloading a sensitive tendon or weight-bearing structure like the meniscus can lead to a slower rehabilitation process. Even more of a problem is skipping out on plyometric progressions all together - as this leaves the athlete unexposed to the high amount of forces and loads that they undoubtedly will face in day to day life like going down a flight of stairs, taking a misstep and needing to put your foot down to prevent a fall, going on hikes with friends and family, and ultimately sport demands! This article will cover some of the tenants of plyometric progressions and special considerations for rehab!

Do you love to clean, jerk, and snatch? Do you sometimes feel sore after doing so? Well, fellow lover of the barbell, fear not! Contained in this article are several exercises that will be sure to warm up your joints properly for any type of Olympic weightlifting you are performing on a given day. Whether you are a competitor in the sport, or simply love to Olympic lift for pleasure, it is imperative to make sure a proper, comprehensive warm up is performed to reduce risk for injury and ongoing pain issues (1, 2). Follow along in this article to learn why Olympic weightlifting is useful, different types of Olympic lifting movements with written and video description, and prehab exercises for Olympic lifting that will ensure you are moving optimally!

Personalized blood flow restriction training is an exercise modality that involves using a cuff to occlude venous blood flow out of a limb while restricting arterial blood flow into a limb. A growing body of evidence now supports the use of blood flow restriction at rest, combined with aerobic training, or combined with low-load resistance training to mitigate disuse muscle atrophy and enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscles. Learn more about blood flow restriction training with this article!

You hear it all the time - whenever someone talks about starting a weightlifting routine, running their first marathon, or starting an off-season workout plan, the advice is always the same: “start slowly”; “progress gradually”; “don’t do too much, too soon”. You might even hear this from a doctor when returning to sports after an injury or surgical procedure. But how much is too much? And how soon, is too soon? No matter what you are doing, the art of gradually progressing is difficult. After reading this article, you will be able to answer the question of what is progressive overload? In addition, you will familiarize yourself with science-based strategies for progressive overload that will ultimately allow you to reach your fitness goals while minimizing your risk of injury!

Looking to improve shoulder overhead mobility but not sure where to start? Maybe you've been told by a clinician or a coach that you need to improve this specific motion, or perhaps you're looking for a guide to help someone else improve their overhead mobility! Shoulder overhead mobility requires multiple moving body parts working together in synchrony. Without adequate motion in the right places, you run the risk of exposing other body regions to excessive strain due to compensatory strategies with attempted shoulder overhead movements. With that being said, addressing limited shoulder overhead mobility requires a multi-dimensional approach. In this article, we will teach you how to assess and improve shoulder overhead mobility with our guidelines.

If you have dealt with an injury before, or if you are an individual in the profession of healthcare, you have heard the word “tendon” with various endings after the root of this word, whether it be “tendinosis”, “tendinitis”, “paratenonitis”, “tenosynovitis” or “tendinopathy”. The terminology behind various tendon conditions is inconsistent in the realm of healthcare, which can lead to confusion for patients and even misdiagnoses by practitioners! In all actuality, does this really matter? For example, think about the Achilles tendon. Will treatment change if someone has an Achilles tendinitis versus an Achilles tendinosis? The answer is YES! Moreover, it is extremely important for individuals to not only receive the correct diagnosis from a healthcare professional but also understand the role they must play in helping facilitate an optimal healing process! In this article, we will review the important differences between tendinitis versus tendinosis, why these differences are important to understand, and evidence-based treatment strategies for these conditions.

Dealing with low back tightness? You're not alone, did you know that low back issues are the most common musculoskeletal complaint and one of the top reasons for time lost at work? However, don't be too alarmed, another way to look at it is low back pain and tightness is like the common cold of the musculoskeletal system. Just like the common cold, there can be a lot of reasons and contributing factors that make low back issues come around. The best way to manage low back tightness is to treat it comprehensively. In this article, you will learn different methods that you can start applying immediately to give you low back relief, as well as a follow-along 5-minute routine that we promise you will make your back feel like a million bucks!

What is your gut reaction when you see a video of a youth athlete performing Olympic lifts? How about an older adult doing a deadlift? Is it appropriate? Is it safe? Should you be performing them? How do we begin strength training? As we move into summer programs, especially for our youth athletes, these questions need to be answered! This article will offer the key FUNdamentals regarding how to begin strength training for youth athletes, as well as a FREE program to get you safely started!