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The general population is spending more and more time in sedentary jobs/positions, sitting down hunched over a computer desk for hours on end. This is leading to adaptive changes that are not in favor of our posterior chain musculature.! The hamstrings and glute's are the body's primary movers, in addition to giving great aesthetics. Therefore, this article will focus on the posterior chain by opening the front of the body whilst strengthening the back of the body. Weight training can be such an efficient and versatile training modality, as you can use it to increase strength, build lean muscle, enhance the power to weight ratio, activate key stabilizers, and improve dynamic mobility. This article will show you the absolute best fundamental lower body exercises!

Hamstring exercises should be a staple in every person's training program. They are a crucial muscle group that is imperative for daily function. The play an important role on a wide spectrum from simple activity to more powerful exercises! To warm up your hamstrings, a healthy dose of dynamic mobility, muscle setting and strengthening, as well as nervous system priming is what creates an excellent warm up routine. Not to worry, you don't have to feel limited to the traditional and boring standing hamstrings stretch and leg curls. In this article, you will learn how to warm up your hamstrings with a variety of excellent exercises targeting mobility, nervous system activation, and muscle activation!

Being stuck in a boot or cast after an injury or surgery is no excuse to not move. It is actually quite the opposite, now is the time to take extra care of the rest of your body! While it is imperative to protect the integrity of the injury/surgical site and allow for proper tissue healing, we can still maintain the strength, range of motion, and health of muscles and joints above and below the area! This article will cover some of our favorite lower extremity exercises to do while "immobilized" or "non-weight bearing" to help keep you staying strong after surgery or an injury. As always, check with your orthopedic surgeon and/or physical therapist to determine which motions and exercise are the right ones for you!

What is the core and how do we train it? When you think of the core, you often think of a "6-pack" or "washboard stomach". However, our core is much more than just the superficial abdominal muscles that are visible to the eye. The core goes much beyond that, with layers of muscles not only on the front of our body, but also on our backs, hips, and even our pelvic floor! The core also consists of input from our nervous system. In this article, we are going to teach you all about the core and how to build core strength!

Quadriceps inhibition or the inability to feel/activate your quadriceps after knee injuries or major knee surgeries like ACL reconstruction can be very frustrating early on in the rehabilitation process. How is it possible that you can't squeeze your quad?! Luckily for you, we'll show you our top 7 cues and expert tips to increase your quadriceps activation and get it firing again!

Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics when performing a squat? Did you know there are different ways to squat by using a knee strategy versus a hip strategy? A knee strategy has been shown to increase the risk of tibiofemoral joint injuries, patellofemoral joint pain, patella tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome. Utilizing a hip strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a knee vs. a hip strategy, and how to fix knee pain with squatting!

Step up and step down exercise variations are amazingly simple, yet truly effective in lower extremity rehab. Step-ups will always be a staple drill in rehabilitation and strength and conditioning programs. Considering the unilateral, weight-bearing nature of the step-up, it effectively challenges recruitment patterns analogous to those encountered during routine activities of daily living and sport. Adding variability to the classic step ups and downs is key to movement proficiency and developing a well-rounded athlete. In addition, the step down is a great way to promote eccentric strength in our lower body, as well as joint stability and control with movements that translate to our activities of daily living as well. In this article, we are going to show you how to master step up and step down variations!

This article is all about basketball shoulder instability rehab! Shoulder injuries are not uncommon in basketball. Shoulder instability can be the result of a shoulder dislocation, labrum injury, or secondary to musculoskeletal or neurological impairments. In this article, you will learn more about shoulder instability in general and how to address it with early, middle, and late rehab progressions. More importantly, you will learn how to prescribe basketball shoulder instability rehab that is specific to the basketball athlete.