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Stretching after a workout should be a stable of any recovery program. Tight muscles can lead to muscle imbalances, abnormal movement patterns, and muscle spasms. However, as with any movement, there is an optimal way to stretch your hamstrings. Proper hamstring stretching does not mean that you should be feeling a stretch in your foot!

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak.

The single leg Romanian deadlift is one of my absolute favorite exercises. Itโ€™s a whole body, complete, functional exercise that can be used for rehabilitation, as well as strength and conditioning purposes alike. While not utilized as commonly in strength and conditioning realms, itโ€™s quite a popular exercise in the physical therapy world due to its ability to work the entire lower extremity posterior chain, while simultaneously challenging oneโ€™s balance.

Medial knee collapse, also known as knee valgus, is when the knee collapses or falls inward during any sort of weight bearing activity, like a squat, during gait, or during sport-specific movements like cutting. Knee valgus is characterized by hip adduction and hip internal rotation in a flexed hip position. This position of the knee is most commonly associated with a non-contact mechanism of injury of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and occurs in the running or jumping athlete during the deceleration phase of a cutting movement. The gluteus maximus plays an interesting role in medial knee collapse.

The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles and their associated tendons that span the shoulder joint, or more anatomically speaking, the glenohumeral joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff is extremely vital to dynamic shoulder joint stability, as they are the only muscles that directly span the glenohumeral joint. While our bigger muscles, like our deltoids, lats, and pectorals control gross movements around the shoulder, the RC acts to stabilize the glenohumeral joint during these movements.

Mike was in China learning from the godfather of the Clinical Practice Guidelines himself, Dr. Joe Godges. Here a great exercise for pepole with neckpain, especially those with whiplash-induced neck pain, that targets not only the deep cervical flexors, but also the deep cervical extensors! Pay close attention to the cueing, as activation of the deep cervical extensors should be emphasized at selected spinal levels for the management of segmental dysfunction.