There is a huge misconception in the fitness and rehab worlds. Far too often, we label exercises as a good exercise or bad exercise for all athletes. Many preach that squats are a must in every athlete’s fitness program and exercises such as behind the neck press’ should never be performed…when in fact, many of these movements can be great for athletic performance. These beliefs are from years of dogma surrounding certain movements. But in reality, any exercise can be a bad exercise if an athlete lacks the requite mobility & motor control. Let's put this bad exercise myth to bed!

It seems as if the fitness industry not too long ago was engulfed in the newest and latest machine. However, the recent pendulum of this industry has been going back to the minimalist end of the spectrum giving attention to calisthenic exercises. This has led to the popularity with exercises such as the Pistol squat AKA the single leg squat. This exercise is a complex movement that is overall encompassing of strength, motor control, and range of motion (particularly at the ankle). This series will break down why you are not able to pistol squat as well as how to have the proper balance of strength, motor control, and mobility to perform this complex movement! Follow along in this article to learn how to pistol squat!

Low back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal diagnoses in the world. The low back is typically considered the lumbar spine region, but it is also important to remember the pelvis and the hips influence motion at the low back. After an injury or experiencing pain in this region, motion in this area can get, 'out of whack'. This can lead to changes in body awareness and as a protective mechanism, the body may move in a more rigid pattern, thus less dissociation from joint to joint. This can lead to someone having difficulty with performing and controlling pelvic tilting. In these scenarios, you have to go back to the basics to retrain the foundations for healthy movement and improving body awareness. This article describes three exercises to help retrain low back movement and pelvic tilting.

Dead bug exercise variations are one of my absolute FAVORITE exercises and if done properly with advanced progressions, they can be a core killer!! Learning to activate your deep spinal stabilizers like the transversus abdominis in these positions is imperative before progressing to more dynamic exercises. As with all "core stabilization" exercises, you MUST PROGRESS THEM to more functional and upright movements once you learn what it feels like to truly stabilize your spine!

This 3-video post will be covering differ lunge variations. We will cover:

➡️ Prehab considerations for multi-directional lunges ➡️ Lunges variations for power development ➡️ Our favorite lunge combo If you don’t already include some lunge variation into your lower body training, hopefully by the end of this article we will have convinced you to not only do so, but also gave you some creative ideas on variations that best suit your goals!

Deadlift variations are simply loaded hip hinge patterns, which is an essential movement pattern to master. There are many benefits to deadlifting, which include improving core stability, improving strength of the lower extremities, improving strength of the lower back, and promoting a more optimal functional movement pattern that is very translatable to activities of daily living. In fact, whether you may know it or not, you potentially deadlift multiple times a day! A few examples include picking up your laundry basket from the floor, lifting up your grandchild, or performing the actual exercise itself in the gym! In particular, the Romanian Deadlift, or RDL, is one of our favorite variations and we'll be sharing our favorite and best RDL variations for [P]Rehab and strength and conditioning goals alike.

The landmine has got to be one of the most underutilized, but highly effective pieces of equipment for adding a challenge and variation into your core movements (push, pull, hip hinge, etc). Even if you don't have a landmine available, you can use a corner of your gym (please use towels so you don't scuff up the walls). Here is a list of our top five favorite landmine exercises.

The team at Accelerate Sports Performance and Training Slate will be discussing the importance of specific muscle activation prior to strength training. More activation = better recruitment = GAINS. Activation techniques can be used in combination with strength exercises in a unilateral or bilateral fashion. In the following posts, they hope to spark some mental juices on how to approach activation exercises for your various lifts, while taking into account some very commonly seen issues in strength training as it relates to arthrokinematic and osteokinematic movement, or natural movement in general.

Before we dive into advanced plank progressions, we must first set straight what the core is and why core stability is so vital for our movement system’s health and longevity. The core, from a muscular standpoint, is so much more than just a 6-pack of washboard arms. It essentially includes any and every that moves the trunk and aids in maintaining a neutral spine position.

This includes the popular “core muscles” such as the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, and multifidus, but also other muscles such as the latissimus dorsi, quadratus lumborum, and pectoralis muscles.