In the musculoskeletal rehabilitative field, we often label different movement and postural pathologies with far-reaching garbage bag terms. Some examples include the upper or lower crossed syndromes, a "SICK" scapula, glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD), or the subject of this article, scapular dyskinesia. Now, garbage bag terms don't necessarily mean that these terms are inherently garbage. They often cast a wide net, capturing many musculoskeletal deficits, providing a general diagnosis for the patient and clinician to work from together. It's understandable why we use them: generally the patient appreciates having a name attached to the reason behind their pain. However, depending on the training and opinions of the clinician, these terms often receive criticism from those in the healthcare field. Are movement and postural pathologies legitimate? For example, is scapular dyskinesia a medical diagnosis or simply a descriptive term to capture aberrant scapular mechanics? More importantly, what is scapular dyskinesia and how do we define this? Is it truly possible to quantify scapular dyskinesia? And if it's truly present, does it actually contribute to shoulder pain -- and can we make a positive impact with a detailed physical therapy or rehabilitation program? If interested, read on: we're going to dive into these questions together here.

The shoulder is a complicated body part. It is an extremely mobile joint that is able to move within many different planes of movement; however, as a result of its ability to move excessively, its stability may sometimes become compromised. In addition, there are other parts of our body that are required to move efficiently in sync with the shoulder in order for healthy shoulder mobility to occur. Because the shoulder is quite complex, proximal body parts are often overlooked when creating various shoulder exercise programs. The glenohumeral joint (shoulder ball-and-socket joint) sits on the scapula (shoulder blade), which moves in accord with the thoracic spine (Mid-Back). A shoulder exercise program is not comprehensive unless all components of the shoulder are addressed. This article will help you understand the various motions that must occur at the shoulder, the spine, and upper extremity as an entire unit, as well as show you excellent exercises that will guide you in how to bulletproof your shoulders!

The shoulder is a very complex joint, one of the most complex in the human body. Moreover, it is the most mobile joint, which means that as a result, it must sacrifice some of its stability. It is imperative for the musculature and soft tissue structures surrounding the shoulder to be bulletproofed with strength in order to give that stability the shoulder needs to function at its optimal capacity. In this article, we will be demonstrating and explaining our favorite evidence based shoulder exercises. Principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and electromyography will be explained as well and you'll learn how to increase targeted muscle activation, improve scapular muscle activation sequencing, and challenge shoulder stability!

The Serratus Anterior, which is also known as the โ€œBig Swing Muscleโ€ or โ€œBoxerโ€™s muscleโ€, is an important muscle that helps optimize proper movement of our shoulders. Not only does this muscle have a cool name, but it is also needed for a plethora of arm movements; whether it be an open chain movement (punching/grabbing something out of the cabinet) or a closed chain movement (pushups, planks, downward dogs, or handstands). Moreover, the serratus anterior is probably best known for its help in preventing scapular winging, which is when our shoulder blade abnormally moves away from our thorax during arm movements. This article will demonstrate the best serratus anterior exercises to improve activation and control of this very important scapular stabilizer!

Are you dealing with a rotator cuff injury? If you answered yes, don't worry! Regardless of the severity of your rotator cuff injury, there is a solution out there for you. We have helped thousands of people with rotator cuff issues, it just comes down to quality education and exercises. In this article, you'll learn about rotator cuff injuries, rotator cuff tests, and exercises for rotator cuff injury!

The ability to reach behind your back does not seem so important until it is taken away from you. Washing your back, grabbing your wallet, taking off your bra, putting on a belt, you name it. All of these simple activities of daily life can become quite difficult the moment you can no longer do them without an issue! However, you can get this motion back with the right exercises, discipline, and ultimately patience. In this article, you'll learn high quality strategies of how to improve reaching behind your back.

Scapular dyskinesis (aka SICK scapula syndrome) is an alteration or deviation in the normal resting or active position of the scapula during shoulder movement. This observation of "abnormal" or "erratic" movement is often associated with pain. But does scapular dyskinesis actually cause a painful shoulder? Does SICK scapula equal pain?