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Personalized blood flow restriction training is an exercise modality that involves using a cuff to occlude venous blood flow out of a limb while restricting arterial blood flow into a limb. A growing body of evidence now supports the use of blood flow restriction at rest, combined with aerobic training, or combined with low-load resistance training to mitigate disuse muscle atrophy and enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscles. Learn more about blood flow restriction training with this article!

You hear it all the time - whenever someone talks about starting a weightlifting routine, running their first marathon, or starting an off-season workout plan, the advice is always the same: “start slowly”; “progress gradually”; “don’t do too much, too soon”. You might even hear this from a doctor when returning to sports after an injury or surgical procedure. But how much is too much? And how soon, is too soon? No matter what you are doing, the art of gradually progressing is difficult. After reading this article, you will be able to answer the question of what is progressive overload? In addition, you will familiarize yourself with science-based strategies for progressive overload that will ultimately allow you to reach your fitness goals while minimizing your risk of injury!

What is your gut reaction when you see a video of a youth athlete performing Olympic lifts? How about an older adult doing a deadlift? Is it appropriate? Is it safe? Should you be performing them? How do we begin strength training? As we move into summer programs, especially for our youth athletes, these questions need to be answered! This article will offer the key FUNdamentals regarding how to begin strength training for youth athletes, as well as a FREE program to get you safely started!  

Progressing exercises is a systematic and organized approach that should be individualized to each person depending on their health, fitness level, and specific goals. The great part about exercise is that everyone is able to start somewhere! No matter what that starting point is for you, the only direction from there is UP. In this article, we will discuss a linear progression of how to progress lower extremity injuries in the clinic. It is imperative to master the fundamentals before working on highly skilled movements. This progression is inspired by the 'Powers Program', which is an evidenced-based lower body exercise progression developed by Dr. Chris Powers, DPT, Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (USC). This program will begin with non-weight bearing isometric holds, don't let these exercises fool you - they are extremely challenging! We then progress to static double leg weight-bearing exercises, followed by single-leg exercises, and finish the exercise progression with dynamic strengthening movements. Follow along in this article to learn how to progress lower body exercises!

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon of the body for a good reason, it takes much of the load when we are running,  jumping, or even walking! This tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel assisting with force transmission and acts like a spring when you push your foot off the floor. Achilles Tendinopathy is when the Achilles tendon is irritated or painful.  The majority of individuals that suffer from Achilles Tendinopathy are active individuals, from the weekend warrior to the high-level athlete. Achilles Tendinopathy seems to be as high as 7-30% in runners, 2.1-5.1% in soccer players, and 12.5% in rock climbers¹. This article will show you an evidence-based approach to how to rehab Achilles tendinopathy.

After surgery, understanding how to improve knee flexion is absolutely critical. While we’ve discussed the importance of regaining knee extension extensively, restoring knee flexion is a close runner up for your rehab goals after surgery. Restoring knee flexion is often not comfortable (as can be for any motion after surgery!), but with dedication and consistent time spent working on your mobility, we are confident you can get there! In this article, we’re going to cover some of our favorite exercises to improve knee flexion after surgery!

Playing in numerous sports throughout my life it seemed the response to injury was pretty much the same, put some ice on it, and RICE (Rest, ICE, Compression, Elevation). However, it felt like there was no real rhyme or reason to this decision, that's just what coaches said to do! For the past three years, I've had the opportunity to provide sideline coverage as a sports physical therapist ranging from youth up to professional sports. Part of this job description is carrying an ice chest from the parking lot to the fields/stadium that typically seem to be uphill and miles away. During this walk, including multiple breaks (the ice chest gets heavy!), I've asked the following: why do we rest, ice, compress, and elevate after injury? Where did this originate? Is this still best practice? In this article, you'll learn the truth about icing injuries and why we need to step away from RICE and move towards PEACE & LOVE.

When an individual sustains an injury, one of the first questions asked is, “How long will it take until I am back to normal?” When an unexpected event such as an injury disrupts our quality of life, naturally we want to return to our full functional capacity as soon as possible. The difficult part of injuries is that there are certain components of them we are unable to control, such as our age, the type of tissue that was injured, the blood supply to a specific tissue, and the extent of damage that was done. However, what we can control is enhancing our understanding of tissue healing, and how to optimize healing times by avoiding factors that could slow the normal healing process. In this article, we will discuss what body tissue is, the normal phases of tissue healing, why various tissues heal differently, and what you need to know about tissue healing after an injury!

FAI (Femoroacetabular Impingement) Syndrome is a condition in which the hip structure has been altered, either genetically, or more commonly through physical stresses.  When someone is diagnosed with FAI, they will present with a CAM Impingement (thickening on the femoral neck), a PINCER impingement (deepening of the hip socket), or a combination of both IN CONJUNCTION with pain/symptoms. It is not uncommon for labral tears to be present with FAI Syndrome as well. This article will focus on exercises for FAI syndrome that individuals can use to manage their associated hip pain!

Are you dealing with a rotator cuff injury? If you answered yes, don't worry! Regardless of the severity of your rotator cuff injury, there is a solution out there for you. We have helped thousands of people with rotator cuff issues, it just comes down to quality education and exercises. In this article, you'll learn about rotator cuff injuries, rotator cuff tests, and exercises for rotator cuff injury!