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Personalized blood flow restriction (BFR) training is a training strategy (or an exercise modality) that involves exercising at low intensities (i.e. 20-35% 1-RM) while occluding venous blood flow out of a limb and restricting arterial blood flow into a limb by using a system that is calibrated based off of personalized limb occlusion pressure. This type of training is accomplished by wrapping off the proximal portion of a limb. In the upper extremity, this is done at the level of the deltoid tuberosity, while in the lower extremity this is performed at the level of the greater trochanter of the femur. As healthcare providers, we recommend using an FDA listed system to perform personalized blood flow restriction training as opposed to other methods such as knee wraps and/or voodoo bands. In this article, we will provide an in-depth review of BFR!

Training equipment is being utilized more than ever by athletes looking to get an edge on improving their performance. Weight lifting shoes, Chuck Taylors, elastic bands, and chains have found their way into the free weight section with the squat & deadlift, but why? Do these items really help according to claims such as improved ankle mobility, squat depth, lifting heavier, and breaking PRs? This article will look at some of the evidence regarding the best training equipment for the squat & deadlift and will shed some light on squat variations using movement analysis technology.

Rock climbing is a sport that has been gaining popularity over the last few years. The diverse range of movement, mobility, and strength the sport requires makes it appealing to everyone from the weekend warrior to the most serious and dedicated athlete. This fast-growing allure has helped catapult climbing into the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The three disciplines that will be included in the upcoming Olympics are sport, bouldering, and speed. Each discipline has its own unique demands varying in power, agility, strength, and endurance naturally inducing risk for both traumatic and overuse injury. In this article, I will highlight the most common injuries seen in rock climbing and demonstrate rock climbing injury prevention exercises based on research and biomechanics to prevent these injuries.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLr) is one of the most common surgeries performed due to a sports injury. ACLr rehab and ACL prevention training is one of the hottest topics in the sports medicine world. The reality is while 80% of ACL reconstruction (ACLr) patients return to some form of sport, only 65% return to the same sporting level and 55% return to sport at a competitive level within 1-2 years post ACLR (1). In this article, we will cover ACL return to sport testing as well as some of the alarming statistics regarding this topic.

Mike had the unique opportunity to spend 4 months treating in China. Sadly, the people there have an extremely low level of education and understanding of their health. Every day in the clinic, we battled not just construed cultural enigmas, "my back hurts because of the cold wind", but also improper education & advice, "my doctor told me if I do anything more vigorous than walking my nerve will impinge and I will be paralyzed". One of the biggest reasons why we embarked on the [P]Rehab mission in the first place was to inject some truth and science into the fitness and health industries. Proper education on your movement system, why you experience pain, and self-management strategies can go a really long way in making this world a much better and happier place. Education is power. Let us educate you on MRIs for low back pain and why you should always take medical imaging with a grain of salt!

Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) became very popular in the fitness, rehab, and sports medicine world a couple of years ago and it is here to stay as it has many applicable uses. FRC focuses on improving mobility. Mobility, in an FRC sense, is defined as strength and control in order to expand upon usable ranges of motion, articular resilience (i.e. load-bearing capacity), and overall joint health. Adding FRC principles into your training and prehab routine can be a huge game-changer! This article will provide you an intro to FRC principles provided with exercise examples that we have included in a variety of our prehab programs.

This article will use a global approach, via Developmental Kinesiology, to train muscles through purposeful movements. Some of you may know this as โ€œDynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization,โ€ (DNS). DNS is originated by Pavel Kolar, who was known as one of the best students of the legend Vlademir Janda. The basis of DNS is on developmental kinesiology; that in early childhood your movement pattern is automatic, predictable, and genetically formed as the nervous system matures.

21st-century golf training is no longer just hitting the range or putting green. It has evolved into functional movement training with mobility, control, strength, and speed at its centerpiece. Not only are professional golfers acknowledging the benefits of this type of training, but so is the average golfer who is now reconsidering what they're doing during their workouts. In this article, you will learn the best exercises for golf!

This โ€œClean Seriesโ€ will delve into the clean through the eyes of a lifter en route to becoming a scholar. We will be discussing a broad spectrum of clean faults and misnomers, along with tried-and-true cues and corrective exercises that can be used for yourself, or your athletes. The clean is an excellent tool for any trainer or rehab specialist alike to build explosiveness, dynamic power, jumping and landing mechanics, and fast-twitch muscle activation in athletes. If you are looking to add some tools to the tool belt this article dedicated to the clean exercise is for you!