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Posterior pelvic tilt, squats, and butt winks - you've got questions and we got answers. This is an awesome topic we are pumped to help you all understand! Everyone has a slightly different boney anatomy, thus we're going to look a bit differently when we move. Whether it’s a longer femur, bent shin (tibial torsion), or a rotated hip socket (acetabular retroversion), not everyone is going to have the exact same anatomical make-up. With that being said, your unique anatomy, in addition to your functional goals, should ultimately drive your specific squat depth. Not everyone is going to squat the same way, and that is ok! So how deep or low should you squat? From an injury prevention and biomechanical perspective, there is only one thing that should matter sometimes, and that is the posterior pelvic tilt. In this article, we are going to help you understand how to control your pelvic movements during the squat to avoid a concept known as 'butt winking' if that is the goal,  and also teach you how much depth you should have when squatting!

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most nagging and limiting orthopedic pathologies in the foot. It's estimated that nearly 2 million Americans experience plantar fasciitis each year and it is the most common condition of the foot in runners. Plantar fasciitis can be defined as inflammation of the plantar fascia and surrounding fascial tissues due to repetitive microtrauma from excessive traction and/or loading forces. However, that nagging heel pain that drives people to want to fix plantar fasciitis is typically not just an acute inflammatory condition but rather a chronic issue that is now revealing itself. In this article, we are going to discuss the common causes and risk factors for this heel pain, as well as how to fix plantar fasciitis! 

There is a huge misconception in the fitness and rehab worlds about 'bad' exercises. Far too often, we label exercises as a good exercise or bad exercise for all athletes, however, these types of blanket statements without any context or exceptions can cause more harm than good. Many preach that squats are a must in every athlete’s fitness program and exercises such as behind the neck press’ should never be performed…when in fact, many of these movements can be great for athletic performance. These beliefs are from years of dogma surrounding certain movements. But in reality, any exercise can be a bad exercise if an athlete lacks the required mobility & motor control. Let's put this bad exercise myth to bed and explain why it always depends!

It seems as if the fitness industry not too long ago was engulfed in the newest and latest machine. However, the recent pendulum of this industry has been going back to the minimalist end of the spectrum giving attention to calisthenic exercises. This has led to the popularity of exercises such as the Pistol squat AKA a modification of the single-leg squat. This exercise is a complex movement that requires strength, motor control, and range of motion (particularly at the ankle). This series will help you identify why you might not able to pistol squat as well as how to gain the proper balance of strength, motor control, and mobility to perform this complex movement! Follow along in this article to learn how to pistol squat!

Low back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal diagnoses in the world. The low back is typically considered the lumbar spine region, but it is also important to remember the pelvis and the hips influence motion at the low back. After an injury or experiencing pain in this region, motion in this area can get, 'out of whack' and you may feel like your alignment is off or your pelvis is tilted too much. This can lead to changes in body awareness and as a protective mechanism, the body may move in a more rigid pattern, thus less dissociation from joint to joint. This can lead to someone having difficulty with performing and controlling pelvic tilting. In these scenarios, you have to go back to the basics to retrain the foundations for healthy movement and improving body awareness. This article describes exercises that will help you fix your pelvic tilt!

The landmine has got to be one of the most underutilized, but highly effective pieces of equipment for adding a challenge and variation into your core movements (push, pull, hip hinge, etc). Even if you don't have a landmine available, you can use a corner of your gym (please use towels so you don't scuff up the walls). This foundational exercise is great for building strength, stability, and motor control in a variety of different ways! Here is a list of our top five favorite landmine exercises.

Muscle activation exercises prior to training, playing sports, and working out is absolutely essential. Oftentimes, we see individuals who become injured because they do not warm up nor cool down properly with exercise. We get it, we know it can be challenging at times to dedicate more time to our workouts. With busy lives, we want to get in and out of the gym as quickly as possible. However, if we cut corners, that is when our bodies can talk back to us with nagging pain and injuries! Moreover, the principles behind muscle activation are essential to encourage optimization of our entire body for fitness! In this article, we are going to show you the best muscle activation exercises prior to training, with a wide variety of specific exercises for activities ranging from deadlifting, playing golf, squatting, basketball, and much more!

Before we dive into advanced plank progressions, we must first set straight what the core is and why core stability is so vital for our movement system’s health and longevity. The core, from a muscular standpoint, is so much more than just a 6-pack of washboard abs. It essentially includes any and every that moves the trunk and aids in maintaining a neutral spine position.

This includes the popular “core muscles” such as the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, and multifidus, but also other muscles such as the latissimus dorsi, quadratus lumborum, and pectoralis muscles.