A common problem in distance runners and change-of-direction sports like football, soccer and hockey, proximal hamstring tendinopathy is a pain in the butt (literally)! Characterized by deep, localized pain over the ischial tuberosity (the large, bony protuberances/bumps on your bottom), this often gets worse with running, lunging, squatting and sitting (1). Often challenging to initially recognize, and located in an area with lots of potential pain generators, proximal hamstring tendinopathy can truly be a bear to manage and resolve. Luckily, there are lots of conservative management options, with therapeutic exercise prescription being a top choice. If it sounds like we're hitting the mark for what you're experiencing with a high hamstring injury, or you're just interested to learn about this common injury, you've come to the right place. Read on to learn more.

Have you ever strained your hamstring before? Youโ€™re not alone! Hamstring strains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal injuries. Athletes who participate in track and field, soccer, and football are especially prone to these injuries given the sprinting demands of these sports. One study found that over a 10-year span in the NFL, the occurrence of hamstring strains was second only to knee sprains. The average number of days lost for athletes with hamstring strains ranged anywhere from 8 to 25 days, which equated to missing up to 4 NFL games or 25% of the season. Even more concerning is that hamstring re-injury rates are extremely high, especially during the first two weeks after return to sport. In fact, over 33% of hamstring reinjuries will reoccur during this time (2). But even with the extremely high reoccurrence rates, there are risk factors that can be addressed now with a proper [P]Rehab routine. In this article, weโ€™ll break down everything you need to know about hamstring strains and the best [P]Rehab exercises for the hamstrings.

Soccer is the worldโ€™s most popular sport and demonstrates continued growth in the United States each year. Over 13 million Americans play soccer, and according to US Youth Soccer, there are over 3 million youth soccer players registered in the United States today. Although there are benefits to playing soccer such as improved cardiovascular health, strength, and self-esteem, there are also some inherent risks involved. One study found that there were over 2.4 million soccer-related injuries leading to an Emergency Room visit between the years 2000 and 2012. Another study showed that soccer is the high school sport with the highest risk of injury for female athletes (1-3). In this article, we will highlight the most common injuries seen in soccer and teach you research-based soccer prehab exercises to help prevent these injuries!