Adhesive capsulitis, or frozen shoulder, affects 2-5% of the general population and is characterized by pain and progressive loss of shoulder range of motion. Frozen shoulder onset can follow trauma to the shoulder, such as a fracture, surgery, or period of immobilization. Adhesive capsulitis can also have an insidious onset, with no prior trauma or injury to the shoulder. There are many established risk factors for the onset of insidious adhesive capsulitis. Of those, diabetics have been identified as having a significantly higher risk of development, severity, and recurrence of insidious onset adhesive capsulitis. In this article, we will help you understand what the term adhesive capsulitis is, what diabetes is, causes and risk factors for these conditions, as well as what the literature is supporting in regards to the correlation between frozen shoulder and diabetes!

The ability to reach behind your back does not seem so important until it is taken away from you. Washing your back, grabbing your wallet, taking off your bra, putting on a belt, you name it. All of these simple activities of daily life can become quite difficult the moment you can no longer do them without an issue! However, you can get this motion back with the right exercises, discipline, and ultimately patience. In this article, you'll learn high quality strategies of how to improve reaching behind your back.