The single leg Romanian deadlift is a whole body, complete, functional exercise that can be used for rehabilitation, as well as strength and conditioning purposes alike. You get phenomenal posterior chain recruitment while working on single leg stability, which is absolutely vital for injury prevention as well as sports performance. Furthermore, because the single leg Romanian deadlift is a variation of a primary movement pattern, the hip hinge, we can scale it up and down in so many different ways to find a suitable exercise variation for anyone! Whether you are a complete newbie to strength and conditioning or a stud who performs the Romanian Deadlift (RD1L) and all its variations regularly, this article will cover the amazing benefits of the single leg Romanian deadlifts as well as a foolproof step-by-step guide to master the single leg Romanian deadlift.

If you spend an afternoon at your local gym long enough, you will inevitably see someone deadlifting in a way that could make your own back hurt! Chances are, you may have even strained your low back trying to master this complex exercise. Yet, you’ve also heard the deadlift being praised as the best exercise for maintaining a strong and healthy back. So, which is it? Is the deadlift the problem or the solution to your back pain? In this article, you’ll learn how the deadlift exercise can help you to overcome back pain, how to perform proper deadlifting with back pain, as well as some key measures supported by research that you can use to evaluate when you are ready to deadlift after a back injury!

The deadlift is one of the best exercises for both the power and strength athlete as well as the recovering patient in rehab. Not only can the lift be progressively overloaded for a proper training/rehab stimulus, but most importantly, it gives individuals the confidence that they CAN in fact lift heavy objects off the floor and combats the notion that "the back is inherently fragile". I mean, if the back was so fragile could it withstand the forces from a world-record 501kg (1104.5lbs) deadlift set by Hafpor Julius Bjornsson, better known as "The Mountain" from the Game of Thrones!? Yes, we are all not built like a strongman, but that doesn't mean that our inherent anatomy precludes us from picking up heavy objects off the floor aka deadlifting. Every individual can and should be able to bend over and pick up an object off the floor. Think about how many times you have helped move furniture, open a garage door, or help a buddy lift an object. Failing to warm up properly before deadlifting is the biggest mistake one can make in the gym, especially when lifting heavier loads. In this article, we're going to go over deadlift warmup essentials to make sure you are prepared and ready to lift some furniture with a friend or hit a new PR in the gym!

Deadlift variations are simply loaded hip hinge patterns, which is an essential movement pattern to master. There are many benefits to deadlifting, which include improving core stability, improving strength of the lower extremities, improving strength of the lower back, and promoting a more optimal functional movement pattern that is very translatable to activities of daily living. In fact, whether you may know it or not, you potentially deadlift multiple times a day! A few examples include picking up your laundry basket from the floor, lifting up your grandchild, or performing the actual exercise itself in the gym! In particular, the Romanian Deadlift, or RDL, is one of our favorite variations and we'll be sharing our favorite and best RDL variations for [P]Rehab and strength and conditioning goals alike.