balance Tag

Ankle sprains are the most common injury in sports and physical activity, estimating to be about 25% of all injuries across sports. Of all ankle injuries, 85% involve the lateral ankle ligaments. There is strong evidence suggesting you increase risk of re-spraining your ankle two fold within the first year of spraining your ankle. Every year in the US, lateral ankle sprain affects 2.15 of every 1,000 people which results in $2 billion of healthcare costs. (Waterman, Owens, Zacchili, & Belmont, 2010). All these costs are primarily from non-invasive treatment. We know that athletes today benefit from the BEST available rehab techniques and here is a statistic that proves my point: in the NBA there are approximately 100 ankle sprains per season, and in the last 11 years there have only been 4 that require surgical intervention. With high incidence of ankle sprains and the associated economic burden/negative chronic consequences, this calls for Preventative measures.

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak.

The single leg Romanian deadlift is one of my absolute favorite exercises. Itโ€™s a whole body, complete, functional exercise that can be used for rehabilitation, as well as strength and conditioning purposes alike. While not utilized as commonly in strength and conditioning realms, itโ€™s quite a popular exercise in the physical therapy world due to its ability to work the entire lower extremity posterior chain, while simultaneously challenging oneโ€™s balance.