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Regaining full terminal knee extension is paramount following any knee surgery. The ability to fully extend the knee equal to the other side is usually one of the most important early goals in knee rehab. While there are a ton of knee extension exercises you can do, the most important variable for regaining full terminal knee extension is the amount of volume and time spent working on knee extension. That is undeniably the most important concept to grasp. 3 sets of 1 min of stretches for a total of 3 minutes (out of 1440 minutes in a day aka 0.2% of the day) is just not enough end range stretching to regain full knee extension! Aim for a total of 10 minutes of knee extension exercises at first, then slowly keep adding time until you're spending at least 30 minutes a day working on terminal knee extension.

Landing mechanics has always been a hot topic within the realm of the rehabilitation and sports medicine world. Letโ€™s be honest, watching elite athletes perform at a high level and analyzing their movement is sexier than most low-level rehab exercises for movement enthusiasts. So itโ€™s natural for clinicians and trainers to get excited when teaching someone landing mechanics. However, we want to ensure that clinicians are thorough when assessing patients, as subtle compensations and poor movement patterns with landing mechanics are often easy to miss! In this article, youโ€™ll learn the basics of what to focus on with teaching landing mechanics!

The function of the foot is extremely important to the overall musculoskeletal function of the body.ย  The foot is the base of support for most everyday activities. Like a game of Jenga, if the base is not solid, the entire structure will lean, wobble, and eventually collapse. If the musculature of the foot is not properly functioning, many structures both locally and globally will be affected. The intrinsic muscles of the feet can become deconditioned over time due to ill-fitting shoes, tight socks, and even some orthotics.ย  Due to cramped spaces and the inability of the joints to function in their natural range of motion, our brains lose the neurological connection to the muscles of our feet, causing compensations. Luckily, neuroplasticity (the ability for our brains to change the neural circuits to our bodies) dictates that it is possible to improve and even reverse chronic instability of the foot, and thus joint pathologies and pain. This article will show you exercises to improve foot strength!

So you fell and twisted your ankle and your foot swelled up like a balloon. You find out you have an ankle fracture and you're sidelined for 4-6 weeks in a cast. Time goes by, you see the doctor and he says the bone is healed, you're good to go! You get the cast removed, but you realize your calf is shriveled up and tiny compared to the other side. Even worse, it hurts to move your foot, your ankle feels weak, you can't even put weight on your foot, now what?! In this article, we will detail exactly what an ankle fracture is and some excellent exercises to jump-start your rehab when you get your cast off. Learn all about what to do after an ankle fracture!

The latissimus dorsi, or the lats for short, play a huge role in shoulder function and health. Often times, these muscles become tight and stiff after injury, surgery, immobilization, a lack of stretching, or repetitive lat overuse/overdevelopment! Because they act to extend and internally rotate the shoulder as well as depress the shoulder girdle, they can severely limit your ability to achieve an optimal overhead position. This is a very important position for just about anyone who does anything with their arms overhead: weightlifters, swimmers, mechanics, athletes, gymnasts, you name it - the overhead position is important for a lot of people! Because so many individuals need full overhead mobility, stretching the lats is a part of many athlete's [P]Rehab programs. This article will show you some of the best lat stretches out there, and more importantly, how to maintain your overhead mobility after lat stretching!

Jumper's knee is when there is irritation of the patella tendon, the tendon just beneath your knee cap. Patella tendon pain is a common source of anterior (front) knee pain often occurring from repetitive or excessive overload onto the patellar tendon. This is often a condition experienced by very active athletes, especially males, who participate in jumping sports such as volleyball, tennis, football, and basketball. Patellar Tendinopathy can be debilitating and result in the prolonged absence and potential retirement from sports. Loading the tendon is the primary stimulus that helps with tendon health, but unfortunately, it's not that simple! This article will teach you all about jumper's knee and more importantly will show you jumper's knee exercises to help you get back to being active!

So you fell on your hand and it swelled up like a balloon. You find out you broke your wrist, experienced a wrist fracture, a FOOSH injury - you name it - it sucks no matter what. Next thing you know you're in a cast for 4-6 weeks. Time goes by, you see the doctor and he says the bone is healed, you're good to go! You get the cast removed, but you realize your wrist and hand look shriveled up and tiny compared to the other side. Even worse, it hurts to move it, your hand feels weak, you can't even put weight through it, now what?! In this article, we will detail exactly what a wrist fracture is and some exercises to jump-start your rehab when you get your cast off. Learn all about what to do after a wrist fracture!

The hip thrust has been increasing in popularity within the last decade. It is arguably the most effective movement to target the glutes. This article will demonstrate how to appropriately perform a hip thrust in addition to showing you many variations to improve the size and strength of your gluteal muscles. When looking at the literature we see how vital gluteal muscle function is in providing knee, pelvis, and trunk stability with the goal of [P]Rehabbing your lower quarter. This article will show you how to master the hip thrust. Your glutes will love you after performing these exercises! Learn how to master the hip thrust exercise!

โ€œWhen will I be fully recovered?" This is honestly one of the most common questions we receive in the clinic working with patients, answering messages on social media, and responding to comments and emails. Understanding recovery from an injury has to begin with understanding what full recovery means to someone. Recovery is also a popular word now within the fitness and sports medicine world in reference to the body's physical readiness. From recreational weightlifters to pro athletes - everyone is eager to learn how to recover faster and push the boundaries of human performance. In this article, we will dive deep into understanding recovery and what it means within different contexts. We will share strategies we use to help individuals better cope with their ongoing recovery and also recovery strategies we use and teach to improve physical readiness. Follow along in this article and learn how to improve recovery!

Can't feel your hip flexor stretch? Are you sure you're doing the hip flexor stretch correctly? You're not alone. The majority of people "stretching" their hip flexors actually aren't performing the stretch correctly and instead are just merely stretching their lower back. This tutorial will walk you through how to stretch your hip flexors the correct way!