Cervical radiculopathy is defined as cervical nerve root compression. Many times, what causes this so-called compression is things like herniated disc material or arthritic bone spurs. It's essentially the "sciatica" of the upper extremity. Common symptoms include neck and radiating arm pain which can travel all the way down into the fingers. Often, this pain is accompanied by sensory disturbances (i.e. pins-and-needles or burning sensations) and even loss of muscle function in more severe cases (muscle weakness and abnormal reflexes). Headaches, neck pain, and scapular pain can also accompany cervical radiculopathy. While not as common as sciatic nerve irritation (only a 0.4% prevalence rate), it can be just as debilitating and a significant cause of neck pain and disability. In this article, we will show you assessment and cervical radiculopathy treatment approaches that you and your physical therapist can employ to get you out of pain!

Recently youโ€™ve begun to feel numbness, tingling, and occasional burning pain in your hand and your co-worker proclaims, โ€œOh no, you have carpal tunnel syndrome!โ€ If that indeed is true, donโ€™t feel like youโ€™ve been struck with a bit of bad luck, as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an extremely common entrapment neuropathy. A study by the University of Manchester estimates that CTS affects 1% to 3% of the general population. A nerve, called the median nerve, runs from your neck (nerve roots C6-T1) throughout your arm and all the way down into your hand and if there is an issue with it you may experience CTS symptoms. In this article, we are going to explain what carpal tunnel is and how to manage it!