Posterior pelvic tilt, squats, and butt winks - you've got questions and we got answers. This is an awesome topic we are pumped to help you all understand! Everyone has a slightly different boney anatomy, thus we're going to look a bit differently when we move. Whether itโ€™s a longer femur, bent shin (tibial torsion), or a rotated hip socket (acetabular retroversion), not everyone is going to have the exact same anatomical make-up. With that being said, your unique anatomy, in addition to your functional goals, should ultimately drive your specific squat depth. Not everyone is going to squat the same way, and that is ok! So how deep or low should you squat? From an injury prevention and biomechanical perspective, there is only one thing that should matter sometimes, and that is the posterior pelvic tilt. In this article, we are going to help you understand how to control your pelvic movements during the squat to avoid a concept known as 'butt winking' if that is the goal,ย  and also teach you how much depth you should have when squatting!

Low back pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal diagnoses in the world. The low back is typically considered the lumbar spine region, but it is also important to remember the pelvis and the hips influence motion at the low back. After an injury or experiencing pain in this region, motion in this area can get, 'out of whack' and you may feel like your alignment is off or your pelvis is tilted too much. This can lead to changes in body awareness and as a protective mechanism, the body may move in a more rigid pattern, thus less dissociation from joint to joint. This can lead to someone having difficulty with performing and controlling pelvic tilting. In these scenarios, you have to go back to the basics to retrain the foundations for healthy movement and improving body awareness. This article describes exercises that will help you fix your pelvic tilt!