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Quadriceps inhibition or the inability to feel/activate your quadriceps after knee injuries or major knee surgeries like ACL reconstruction can be very frustrating early on in the rehabilitation process. How is it possible that you can't squeeze your quad?! Luckily for you, we'll show you our top 7 cues and expert tips to increase your quadriceps activation and get it firing again!

This article is all about basketball shoulder instability rehab! Shoulder injuries are not uncommon in basketball. Shoulder instability can be the result of a shoulder dislocation, labrum injury, or secondary to musculoskeletal or neurological impairments. In this article, you will learn more about shoulder instability in general and how to address it with early, middle, and late rehab progressions. More importantly, you will learn how to prescribe basketball shoulder instability rehab that is specific to the basketball athlete.

This article will cover lateral ankle sprain advanced exercises & techniques. We have written a previous ankle [P]Rehab article on how to [P]Rehab your ankles and initially manage a lateral ankle sprain. However, how do you get the ankle back to 100%? What exercises should you include in the athlete's training sessions to best prepare them for returning to play? What can clinicians do hands-on to rehab and help support a lateral ankle sprain? Read more to find out!

Hamstring injuries are among the most common non-contact injuries in sports. It is important to train hamstring muscles optimally in order to prevent these injuries from occurring. In this article, we're going to show you how to strengthen your hamstrings, by covering our favorite hamstring exercises including nordic hamstring curl variations as well as swiss ball hamstring variations to prehab against hamstring strains!

Slings (also referred to as chains and/or loops) are a functional component of the musculoskeletal system. If we think of our torso as a core cylinder, there are multiple slings that wrap around the cylinder in different orientations. The cylinder depends on strength and balance from the slings to provide a stable foundation. This article will cover a brief overview of the sling systems, as well as cover the anterior and posterior oblique sling exercise progressions and assessment!

Personalized blood flow restriction (BFR) training is a training strategy (or an exercise modality) that involves exercising at low intensities (i.e. 20-35% 1-RM) while occluding venous blood flow out of a limb and restricting arterial blood flow into a limb by using a system that is calibrated based off of personalized limb occlusion pressure. This type of training is accomplished by wrapping off the proximal portion of a limb. In the upper extremity, this is done at the level of the deltoid tuberosity, while in the lower extremity this is performed at the level of the greater trochanter of the femur. As healthcare providers, we recommend using an FDA listed system to perform personalized blood flow restriction training as opposed to other methods such as knee wraps and/or voodoo bands. In this article, we will provide an in-depth review of BFR!

Rock climbing is a sport that has been gaining popularity over the last few years. The diverse range of movement, mobility, and strength the sport requires makes it appealing to everyone from the weekend warrior to the most serious and dedicated athlete. This fast-growing allure has helped catapult climbing into the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. The three disciplines that will be included in the upcoming Olympics are sport, bouldering, and speed. Each discipline has its own unique demands varying in power, agility, strength, and endurance naturally inducing risk for both traumatic and overuse injury. In this article, I will highlight the most common injuries seen in rock climbing and demonstrate rock climbing injury prevention exercises based on research and biomechanics to prevent these injuries.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLr) is one of the most common surgeries performed due to a sports injury. ACLr rehab and ACL prevention training is one of the hottest topics in the sports medicine world. The reality is while 80% of ACL reconstruction (ACLr) patients return to some form of sport, only 65% return to the same sporting level and 55% return to sport at a competitive level within 1-2 years post ACLR (1). In this article, we will cover ACL return to sport testing as well as some of the alarming statistics regarding this topic.

Cervical radiculopathy is defined as cervical nerve root compression. Many times, what causes this so-called compression is things like herniated disc material or arthritic bone spurs. It's essentially the "sciatica" of the upper extremity. Common symptoms include neck and radiating arm pain which can travel all the way down into the fingers. Often, this pain is accompanied by sensory disturbances (i.e. pins-and-needles or burning sensations) and even loss of muscle function in more severe cases (muscle weakness and abnormal reflexes). Headaches, neck pain, and scapular pain can also accompany cervical radiculopathy. While not as common as sciatic nerve irritation (only a 0.4% prevalence rate), it can be just as debilitating and a significant cause of neck pain and disability. In this article, we will show you assessment and cervical radiculopathy treatment approaches that you and your physical therapist can employ to get you out of pain!