Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics when performing a squat? Did you know there are different ways to squat by using a knee strategy versus a hip strategy? A knee strategy has been shown to increase the risk of tibiofemoral joint injuries, patellofemoral joint pain, patella tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome. Utilizing a hip strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a knee vs. a hip strategy, and how to fix knee pain with squatting!

While our focus is on prehab, such as finding the weak links in your movement system and addressing them through specifically targeted exercises, we are big advocates of barbell training and we do so regularly. That being said, not everyone is a fan of (or comfortable with) getting under a barbell - especially in the rehabilitation setting. So if you are unable to get your clients or patients under the barbell and are looking for exercises that elicit similar electromyography (EMG) activity to the traditional back squat, look no further than the rear foot elevated split squat aka the Bulgarian split squat! In this article, we are covering everything you need to know about Bulgarian Split Squats including the why, alignment, set-up, and variations!

Squatting is not only an exercise that can be quite physically demanding, but it is also a prerequisite to healthy human movement! In order to hit and break PRs or just make your life easier on a daily basis, you want squatting to be easy and effortless! Preparation is key when it comes to moving and squatting better, and that is why we decided to write about the best squat warm-up that you can easily implement! This article features some of our favorite content that will squat prep your body for every type of squat you can think of.

Posterior pelvic tilt and squats. This is an awesome topic we are pumped to help you all understand! Everyone has a slightly different bony anatomy. Whether itโ€™s a longer femur, bent shin (tibial torsion), or a rotated hip socket (acetabular retroversion), not everyone is going to have the exact same anatomical make-up. With that being said, your unique anatomy, in addition to your functional goals, should ultimately drive your specific squat depth. Not everyone is going to squat the same way, and that is ok! So how deep or low should you squat? From an injury prevention and biomechanical perspective, there is only one thing that should matter, which is the posterior pelvic tilt. In this article, we are going to help you understand how to control your pelvic movements during squat to avoid a concept known as 'butt winking',ย  and also teach you how much depth you should have when squatting!

It seems as if the fitness industry not too long ago was engulfed in the newest and latest machine. However, the recent pendulum of this industry has been going back to the minimalist end of the spectrum giving attention to calisthenic exercises. This has led to the popularity of exercises such as the Pistol squat AKA a modification of the single-leg squat. This exercise is a complex movement that requires strength, motor control, and range of motion (particularly at the ankle). This series will help you identify why you might not able to pistol squat as well as how to gain the proper balance of strength, motor control, and mobility to perform this complex movement! Follow along in this article to learn how to pistol squat!

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