shoulder Tag

Serratus Anterior, which is also known as the โ€œBig Swing Muscleโ€ or โ€œBoxerโ€™s muscleโ€ due to its effectiveness of protracting the scapula. Not only does this muscle have a cool name, but it is also needed for a plethora of arm movements; weather open chain (punching/grabbing something out of the cabinet) or closed chain (pushups, planks, downward dogs, or handstands). Due to its large role in stabilizing the scapula, ย inadequate strength here is often the culprit of Scapula Winging.ย This article will demonstrate a few exercises to improve activation and control of this Scapula Stabilizer in open kinetic chain.

Scapular dyskinesis (aka SICK scapula syndrome) is an alteration or deviation in the normal resting or active position of the scapula during shoulder movement. This observation of "abnormal" or "erratic" movement is often associated with pain.ย โ‰But does scapular dyskinesis actually cause a painful shoulder? Does SICK scapula equal painย โ‰

This isn't your average rotator cuff and scapula article. We will be demonstrating and explaining seven evidence based shoulder exercises. Principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and electromyography will be explained and you'll learn how to increase targeted muscle activation, improve scapular muscle activation sequencing, and challenge shoulder stability. We are taking broscience to the next level, providing research and evidence based shoulder exercises to prehab the shoulders for longevity.

This article will use a global approach, via Developmental Kinesiology, to train muscles through purposeful movements. Some of you may know this as โ€œDynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization,โ€ (DNS). DNS is originated by Pavel Kolar, who was known as one of the best student of the legend Vlademir Janda. The basis of DNS is on developmental kinesiology; that in early childhood your movement pattern is automatic, predictable, and genetically formed as the nervous system matures.

The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles and their associated tendons that span the shoulder joint, or more anatomically speaking, the glenohumeral joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff is extremely vital to dynamic shoulder joint stability, as they are the only muscles that directly span the glenohumeral joint. While our bigger muscles, like our deltoids, lats, and pectorals control gross movements around the shoulder, the RC acts to stabilize the glenohumeral joint during these movements.