Think about that last ankle sprain or wrist sprain you suffered, what did you do  immediately following the injury? Probably ice, add a little compression, and elevate that body part. Great idea, you did the right thing, but it’s time for the therapy world to shift away from the acronym RICE and shift towards the POLICE Principle for injury recovery and tissue healing. Haven’t heard this acronym yet? Want to learn how to speed up the recovery process? Want to learn why rice/rest doesn't work for injuries? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

The Serratus Anterior, which is also known as the “Big Swing Muscle” or “Boxer’s muscle”, is an important muscle that helps optimize proper movement of our shoulders. Not only does this muscle have a cool name, but it is also needed for a plethora of arm movements; whether it be an open chain movement (punching/grabbing something out of the cabinet) or a closed chain movement (pushups, planks, downward dogs, or handstands). Moreover, the serratus anterior is probably best known for its help in preventing scapular winging, which is when our shoulder blade abnormally moves away from our thorax during arm movements. This article will demonstrate the best serratus anterior exercises to improve activation and control of this very important scapular stabilizer!

Are core exercises as important as we once thought? Several reviews have recently challenged the idea of improving core stability for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. There is strong evidence suggesting that stabilization exercises are no more effective than other forms of active exercise in the long term. That is not to say that core exercises have no utility, as I prescribe core exercises on a daily basis within the clinic. This article demonstrates a few advanced core exercises that you can perform to take your core muscle function to the next level!

Did you know there are 27 muscles that cross the ball and socket hip joint?! Some muscles act as primary movers while others act as dynamic stabilizers for the hip. When the hip capsule is hypomobile (or tight), your body is likely to compensate either up or down the kinetic chain to still achieve movement. This can lead to various pathologies in the lumbar spine as well as the lower extremity (1-5). The good news is there are many ways that someone can improve their hip mobility. In this article, you will learn why hip mobility is important for overall movement capacity and longevity, and we will show you 4 exercises to improve your hip mobility!