Have you ever experienced pain at a joint and/or muscle? Well, you are not alone. It is pretty safe to say that everyone at some point in their life will experience some sort of musculoskeletal pain. Traditionally, we are quick to blame the affected body part and address it in a localized fashion. What if I told you that your bad knees, shoulder, low back, etc. are only the victims of a dysfunction elsewhere in your body? Treating the โ€˜painfulโ€™ body part can potentially improve your symptoms, but ultimately this remedy is destined to only be temporary, as the dysfunction elsewhere in the body is left untreated. Think of it as having a flat tire in your car and trying to fix the steering wheel for not working properly. Learn how to independently understand, identify problems, and improve your body's mobility. Consequently, learn how to address pain anywhere in your body with a more promising and lasting approach! In this article, we are going to show you the joint-by-joint approach for mobility to enhance your movement patterns!

Sedentary lifestyles are an undesirable hallmark of modern society, affecting a significant proportion of the population. Prolonged sitting, (a form of sedentary behavior), has progressively become the norm with computerization in the workplace. These developments are not only detrimental to physiological health and well-being with rising levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, but also musculoskeletal health. Recent research findings have found an association between prolonged sitting (>8 hours a day) and increased neck, shoulder, and low back pain. This is why posture has become such a hot topic and what are the best exercises for a good versus bad posture! When we think about posture, it always brings us to thoracic spine mobility. Sedentary behaviors may induce a relatively stiff thoracic spine contributing towards the dysfunction in the adjacent spinal regions. This article will provide you with exercises to improve your thoracic spine mobility!

You probably have been told that you donโ€™t spend enough time stretching. Whether it was by a coach, a physical therapist, or a doctor; youโ€™ve probably heard that you could have prevented an injury by stretching more. You may have also been told that if you donโ€™t start stretching more, you will get hurt again! Like most people, you probably took the time to go through a full stretching routine before your next couple of workouts but slowly returned to your old habit of not stretching. Well, I am here with some good news: you donโ€™t need to spend more time stretching! This probably comes as a shock to a lot of you, so letโ€™s tackle the myths behind the benefits of stretching one by one, ultimately helping you answer the question, "How much do I need to stretch?".

Did you know there are 27 muscles that cross the ball and socket hip joint?! Some muscles act as primary movers while others act as dynamic stabilizers for the hip. When the hip capsule is hypomobile (or tight), your body is likely to compensate either up or down the kinetic chain to still achieve movement. This can lead to various pathologies in the lumbar spine as well as the lower extremity (1-5). The good news is there are many ways that someone can improve their hip mobility. In this article, you will learn why hip mobility is important for overall movement capacity and longevity, and we will show you 4 exercises to improve your hip mobility!

Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) became very popular in the fitness, rehab, and sports medicine world a couple of years ago and it is here to stay as it has many applicable uses. FRC focuses on improving mobility. Mobility, in an FRC sense, is defined as strength and control in order to expand upon usable ranges of motion, articular resilience (i.e. load-bearing capacity), and overall joint health. Adding FRC principles into your training and prehab routine can be a huge game-changer! This article will provide you an intro to FRC principles provided with exercise examples that we have included in a variety of our prehab programs.