mobility Tag

Sedentary lifestyles are an undesirable hallmark of modern society, affecting a significant proportion of the population. Prolonged sitting (a form of sedentary behavior) has progressively become the norm with computerization in the workplace. These developments are not only detrimental for physiological health and well-being with rising levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, but also musculoskeletal health. Recent research findings have found an association between prolonged sitting (>8 hours a day) and increased neck-shoulder and low back pain. Sedentary behaviors may induce a relatively stiff thoracic spine contributing towards the dysfunction in the adjacent spinal regions. This article will provide you exercises to improve your thoracic spine mobility!

The hip is a ball and socket joint with 27 muscles that cross it to control its many planes of movement! Some muscles act as primary movers while others act as dynamic stabilizers of the hip. When the hip capsule is hypomobile or tight, your body may compensate from either up or down the kinetic chain to gain mobility. This has been shown to lead to pathologies in the lumbar spine (Reiman 2009, Devin 2012, Burns 2011) and lower extremity (Reiman 2009, Cliborne 2004, and Currier 2007). This article will show you 4 exercises to improve your Hip Mobility!

Functional Range Conditioning (FRC), created by @drandreospina, is essential to incorporate into your practice. FRC focuses on improving mobility. Mobility, in an FRC sense, is defined as STRENGTH + CONTROL in order to expand upon usable ranges of motion, articular resilience (i.e. load bearing capacity), and overall joint health. Prioritizing FRC principles in your training and [P]Rehab program can be a huge game changer! This article will provide you an intro to FRC principles provided with exercise examples.