knee pain Tag

Knee pain is by far the most common complaint we hear in the clinic from patients. Sometimes it's from traumatic injuries like a fall or sporting event. Other times, people don't even know when or how their knee pain started, but they have been living with low-level knee pain for years! To us, this is unacceptable, especially the latter. Not being proactive about your health and addressing issues before they become a bigger problem is why we have clinical jobs as physical therapists. So many of the knee injuries we see in the clinic we truly believe could be prevented with knee prehab. A systematically designed progressive loading program to strengthen the quadriceps and hamstrings while also addressing the hips and ankles will do wonders for just about every knee on the face of the earth. And even more importantly, education on how to manage flare-ups, how to perform exercises in the correct way, or knowing what type of discomfort is good vs bad is how we will teach you to have to become your own best physical therapist. Our Knee [P]Rehab program is your answer to your cranky knees, chronic injuries, improperly rehabbed surgical interventions, and duck legs. In this article, we're going to show you why you need knee prehab, the story behind the program, insider access to some of the program content, and most importantly how to get started with your knee Prehab now!

Jumper's knee is when there is irritation of the patella tendon, the tendon just beneath your knee cap. Patella tendon pain is a common source of anterior (front) knee pain often occurring from repetitive or excessive overload onto the patellar tendon. This is often a condition of younger athletes, especially men, who participate in jumping sports such as volleyball, tennis, football, and basketball. Patella Tendinopathy is debilitating and can result in the prolonged absence and potential retirement from sports. Loading the tendon is the primary stimulus which helps with tendon health! This article will take you through a few common jumper's knee exercises!

Knee surgery prehab exercises that include range of motion and strengthening exercises have been shown to improve strength and function prior to surgery, improve strength and function after surgery, can potentially decrease hospital stay times, and improve long term function and quality of life! We have put together some of our favorite knee prehab exercises to jumpstart your road to recovery, better yet it may even spare you from surgery for the time being. Continue reading!

Do you have knee pain? Have you tried changing your movement mechanics?ย Did you know there is a difference between a knee strategy and a hip strategy? A Knee Strategy has been shown to increase risk of Tibiofemoral joint injury, Patellofemoral joint pain, Patella Tendinopathy, ACL sprains, as well as IT band syndrome.ย Utilizing a Hip Strategy with movements such as squatting, stair climbing, and jumping will reduce demand on your knees, which may reduce your knee pain or help prevent you from having knee pain in the future! Read more to understand the difference between a Knee vs. a Hip Strategy, Changing your mechanics can improve your knee pain!

So you've been trying to get back into shape and just when you caught stride your knees started to hurt, now what!? There are a few key elements with handling this issue that include optimal exercise selection, smart programming, and activity modification. Here is a comprehensive approach on how to stay active and manage your knee pain regarding different physical activities including running and hiking.

Medial knee collapse, also known as knee valgus, is when the knee collapses or falls inward during any sort of weight bearing activity, like a squat, during gait, or during sport-specific movements like cutting. Knee valgus is characterized by hip adduction and hip internal rotation in a flexed hip position. This position of the knee is most commonly associated with a non-contact mechanism of injury of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and occurs in the running or jumping athlete during the deceleration phase of a cutting movement. The gluteus maximus plays an interesting role in medial knee collapse.