Progressing exercises is a systematic and organized approach that should be individualized to each person depending on their health, fitness level, and specific goals. The great part about exercise is that everyone is able to start somewhere! No matter what that starting point is for you, the only direction from there is UP. In this article, we will discuss a linear progression of how to progress lower extremity injuries in the clinic. It is imperative to master the fundamentals before working on highly skilled movements. This progression is inspired by the 'Powers Program', which is an evidenced-based lower body exercise progression developed by Dr. Chris Powers, DPT, Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (USC). This program will begin with non-weight bearing isometric holds, don't let these exercises fool you - they are extremely challenging! We then progress to static double leg weight-bearing exercises, followed by single-leg exercises, and finish the exercise progressionย with dynamic strengthening movements. Follow along in this article to learn how to progress lower body exercises!

Do your hips feel tight? Do you want to learn how to improve the mobility of your hips? The hip is one of the most active and mobile joints in the human body. Whether you perform activities such as walking, ambulating stairs, deadlifts, or playing sports, having adequate hip mobility is important to all! Hip mobility limitations have been associated with issues both upstream (at the low back) and downstream (at the knee). This article will educate you on exercises for tight hips and how to perform them correctly! Weโ€™ve also included a FREE program so you can begin performing prehab exercises today!

Medial knee collapse, also known as knee valgus, is when the knee collapses or falls inward during any sort of weight-bearing activity, like a squat, during gait, or during sport-specific movements like cutting. Knee valgus is characterized by hip adduction and hip internal rotation in a flexed hip position. This position of the knee is most commonly associated with a non-contact mechanism of injury of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and occurs in the running or jumping athlete during the deceleration phase of a cutting movement. The gluteus maximus plays an interesting role in medial knee collapse and can help with preventing knee valgus. In this article, we will show you how to prevent knee valgus with gluteus maximus targeted exercises!