Itโ€™s that time of year when back to school physical examinations are in high demand so students can participate in sports, have their weight and height monitored, and be evaluated for scoliosis. Waitโ€ฆ.scoliosis? Yes, scoliosis. When primary care providers have an adolescent bend over to touch their toes, they are assessing the spine and looking for any abnormal curvature that could warrant further imaging to determine if scoliosis is present. So, is this why, at your yearly exam as a kid, you had to bend over and touch your toe? Yes, absolutely!ย  Letโ€™s chat a bit about what scoliosis is, who it affects, and what treatment options there are to keep a spine with scoliosis happy, including some awesome scoliosis exercises.ย 

The Pelvic Floor is a term that is gaining more and more attention in the healthcare world. You might have heard this term specifically geared toward women or childbirth, or you might think that older folks are the only people with pelvic floor problems. You might be thinking what exactly is the pelvic floor, do I have one, and what can I do to help improve my pelvic floor health. Letโ€™s begin with the basics by breaking down what is the pelvic floor exactly, and we will then demonstrate a few pelvic floor exercises that can allow you to maintain a healthy pelvic floor!

Are core exercises as important as we once thought? Several reviews have recently challenged the idea of improving core stability for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. There is strong evidence suggesting that stabilization exercises are no more effective than other forms of active exercise in the long term. That is not to say that core exercises have no utility, as I prescribe core exercises on a daily basis within the clinic. This article demonstrates a few advanced core exercises that you can perform to take your core muscle function to the next level!

In this article, you will learn a six-week core training program that is supported by research to increase passive core stiffness. As explained by the great Stuart McGill, improving core stiffness can help with the ability to transfer force and can enhance the amount of load the spine can handle. Both of these attributes can improve an individual's athleticism and overall performance with any task!

What is the core and how do we train it? When you think of the core, you often think of a "6-pack" or "washboard stomach". However, our core is much more than just the superficial abdominal muscles that are visible to the eye. The core goes much beyond that, with layers of muscles not only on the front of our body, but also on our backs, hips, and even our pelvic floor! The core also consists of input from our nervous system. In this article, we are going to teach you all about the core and how to build core strength!

Slings (also referred to as chains and/or loops) are a functional component of the musculoskeletal system. If we think of our torso as a core cylinder, there are multiple slings that wrap around the cylinder in different orientations. The cylinder depends on strength and balance from the slings to provide a stable foundation. This article will cover a brief overview of the sling systems, as well as cover the anterior and posterior oblique sling exercise progressions and assessment!

Dead bug exercise variations are one of our absolute favorite exercises when done properly with advanced progressions, they can be a core killer!! Learning to activate your deep spinal stabilizers like the transversus abdominis in these positions is a stepping stone for progressing to more dynamic exercises. As with all "core stabilization" exercises, you must progress them to more functional and upright movements once you learn what it feels like to truly stabilize your spine!