Hip

This 3-video post will be covering differ lunge variations. We will cover:

โžก๏ธ Prehab considerations for multi-directional lunges โžก๏ธ Lunges variations for power development โžก๏ธ Our favorite lunge combo If you donโ€™t already include some lunge variation into your lower body training, hopefully by the end of this article we will have convinced you to not only do so, but also gaveย you some creative ideas on variations that best suit your goals!

In the words of the glute guyย @bretcontreras1 himself "deadlifting oozes strength and functionality. There's something to bending over, grabbing a hold of heavy weight, and standing up with it that makes you feel like a primal powerhouse." Deadlift variations are simply loaded hip hinge patterns, which is an essential movement pattern to master not only in the gym, but also in day to day function.

In particular, rhe Romanian Deadlift, or RDL, is one of our favorite variations and we'll be sharing our top 5 favorite and best RDL variations for [P]Rehab and strength and conditioning goals alike.

The landmine has got to be one of the most underutilized, but highly effective pieces of equipment for adding a challenge and variation into your core movements (push, pull, hip hinge, etc). Even if you don't have a landmine available, you can use a corner of your gym (please use towels so you don't scuff up the walls). Here is a list of our top five favorite landmine exercises.

The team at Accelerate Sports Performance and Training Slate will be discussing the importance of specific muscle activation prior to strength training. More activation = better recruitment = GAINS.ย Activation techniques can be used in combination with strength exercises in a unilateral or bilateral fashion. In the following posts, they hope to spark some mental juices on how to approach activation exercises for your various lifts, while taking into account some very commonly seen issues in strength training as it relates to arthrokinematic and osteokinematic movement, or natural movement in general.

Stretching after a workout should be a stable of any recovery program. Tight muscles can lead to muscle imbalances, abnormal movement patterns, and muscle spasms. However, as with any movement, there is an optimal way to stretch your hamstrings. Proper hamstring stretching does not mean that you should be feeling a stretch in your foot!

Hip strengthening should be a stable of any rehabilitation or strength and conditioning program. The hip musculature is capable of generating large amounts of torque used for explosive athletic movements. Additionally, the hips are the key to trunk and core stability, and therefore balance. To be simplistic, our trunk sits on top of our hips. Thus, if our hips are weak, it doesnโ€™t matter how much core strengthening we do, because the foundation on which our core sits upon is weak.

The single leg Romanian deadlift is one of my absolute favorite exercises. Itโ€™s a whole body, complete, functional exercise that can be used for rehabilitation, as well as strength and conditioning purposes alike. While not utilized as commonly in strength and conditioning realms, itโ€™s quite a popular exercise in the physical therapy world due to its ability to work the entire lower extremity posterior chain, while simultaneously challenging oneโ€™s balance.

Medial knee collapse, also known as knee valgus, is when the knee collapses or falls inward during any sort of weight bearing activity, like a squat, during gait, or during sport-specific movements like cutting. Knee valgus is characterized by hip adduction and hip internal rotation in a flexed hip position. This position of the knee is most commonly associated with a non-contact mechanism of injury of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL), and occurs in the running or jumping athlete during the deceleration phase of a cutting movement. The gluteus maximus plays an interesting role in medial knee collapse.